• Create a Community Nature Reserve in Greystones & Delgany
    What if we made Greystones & Delgany greener, healthier and wilder? What if we were the first region in Ireland to create biosecurity by 2026? We can all be part of a legacy we can be proud of: handing over to our children and future generations an area that is climate-resilient and supports our wildlife to live alongside us. Please support this petition and we will bring it to the Government and Wicklow County Council to transform Greystones & Delgany (and North Wicklow). Greystones & Delgany are currently undergoing a frenzy of development, with new housing estates approved and planted in every available field left. Not only is the infrastructure (roads, public transport links, schools, healthcare, etc.) not keeping up, but nature is taking a huge hit. So what if the answer to overdevelopment was to create a Community Nature Reserve – a gift to current and future generations? Following 2 years of research by Eoin Llewellyn here are key realistic projects that can be implemented to rehabilitate nature. • Expand the Glen of the Downs on both sides of the Three-Trout stream with permanent native forest. • Return Kindlestown Forest to permanent native woodland (under the Government's new Project Woodland and/or Coillte's Millenium Forests programme) as each Sitka spruce plot is harvested, and link it to the Glen of the Downs SAC (Special Area of Conservation). • Relist and protect the Bronze Age hillforts of Coolagad (Kindlestown) and Downshill, ahead of the millennial anniversary of the Battle of Delgany 1022. (see Yasmin Fortune's research on www.glenodownsheritage.com) • Create 20-meter wide riparian ways and a nature reserve along the full course of the Three-Trout Stream, with green link path for people to walk and/or cycle to school and work. (see Eoin Llewellyn's research https://www.mywildireland.ie/projects/ • Add chestnut fencing and a raised boardwalk on South Beach to protect coastal flora and dune grasses from collapse, plus nature signage indicating plants and insects present. • Create a coastal nature reserve on 2 fields east of the railway line above the North Beach, thus extending Bray Head SAC (Special Area of Conservation) into Greystones. If this Nature Reserve was to see the light of day, Greystones & Delgany would become the first biosecure area in Ireland by 2026! At a time when successive lockdowns have highlighted the dire need for green spaces near urban centers, Greystones & Delgany could become a flagship example of a town living in harmony with nature, and a template to be replicated across the county and country. As the next County Development Plan is being drafted, let's change the story of Greystones & Delgany - from a town besieged by suburban sprawl, to a place where a greener, healthier and wilder future is possible. See - https://www.mywildireland.ie/projects/
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    Created by Annette Vaucanson Kelly Picture
  • Remove Annacotty weir on the River Mulkear
    Annacotty weir is located in the lower reaches of the River Mulkear, Co Limerick. This is part of the Lower River Shannon Special Area of Conservation (SAC). This is a relatively minor weir - but it causes a major fish passage problem. The weir has no purpose. It is an ornamental weir that was installed as part of an Office of Public Works (OPW) flood scheme. The main species affected are River Lampreys and Sea Lampreys which are both Qualifying Interests of this Natura 2000 river. But it’s not just lampreys that are affected – the upstream migration of Atlantic Salmon is also delayed by this weir, and under certain medium flows salmon have great difficulty passing this obstacle. Some salmon never get past, and all are stressed and waste valuable energy trying to scale this difficult barrier. Furthermore this weir blocks the migration of the critically endangered European eel. I want the OPW, Inland Fisheries Ireland, and Limerick City and County Council to engage with both myself and other interested and committed people who want to remove this fish migration barrier. The problems at this site have been highlighted for many years yet nothing effective has been done. Measures taken by the Mulkear LIFE project at this site did not work. There is widespread support for effective action to be taken to finally address the fish passage issues at Annacotty weir. It is now time for the above government agencies to do what they regularly claim to do - which is to engage with volunteers like myself working on local environmental projects to bring waterbodies back to ‘Good Status’, and Annex II species in Natura 2000 rivers back to Favorable Conservation Status’. I also again commit to work on a pro bono basis to input into the design of a solution for this site, and prepare the required ecological assessments to support the necessary planning application and Appropriate Assessment. If we can’t address the fish passage issues at this relatively minor weir then how will be ever able to address the major issues on the main River Shannon caused by the ESB dams. Having lampreys confined to the lower reaches of this major catchment makes them vulnerable to impacts such as declining water quality. Lampreys are also blocked on the main River Shannon by the ESB dams so are very confined in this catchment. Salmon are also affected by this weir and are at unfavorable status in this catchment. We have to all we can to help the critically endangered Eel. Annacotty weir needs to be removed - or lowered with a rock ramp fish pass installed. This would restore fish migration in this large tributary of the Lower River Shannon. This action is required under both the EU Habitats and Water Framework Directives.
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    Created by Will O'Connor Picture
  • Please stop the spraying of Pesticides and Herbicides
    In early 2020 Monaghan County Council passed a motion to address the use of pesticides and to allow low/no mow in some areas for the protection of pollinators and other biodiversity. When we then went into lockdown, council services were put on hold and there was a lot of spring growth that wasn't being managed in any way, which led to complaints from the public about messiness and overgrowth. As a result, the motion was reversed. The timing was unfortunate, as areas can be managed for beneficial wildness without becoming too messy and they can be very beautiful too! OUR ASK We are asking for Monaghan County Council to set an example and put some proper guidelines and policies in place before we do too much damage to our outer and inner ecosystems. DAMAGING OUR ENVIRONMENT – OUTER ECOSYSTEM The use of pesticides and herbicides is causing huge losses in our local biodiversity. Reduced biodiversity means humans will face a future where (1) our food supply will be more prone to failure (because no pollinators) and more vulnerable to pests and diseases (because we have messed with the natural food chains in delicately balanced ecosystems), and (2) where our water supply has been compromised. There have been a number of articles published recently about exceedances of pesticides in national and local water supplies and there is an appeal to the public to consider alternatives for gardening, farming and maintenance of sports grounds. DAMAGING OUR BODIES – INNER ECOSYSTEM Human exposure starts in the womb when pregnant women share their body’s chemical accumulation across the placenta, where it becomes part of a developing baby’s first environment. This exposure continues throughout childhood when the fast-growing bodies of children take in more food, water and air than adults. A child’s biological systems are developing rapidly and can be disrupted by micro-doses of toxins during this period. The levels of pesticides and other chemicals in adults reflects each person’s unique accumulation and storage of chemicals over their lifetime. Just as children are particularly susceptible to chemical harm in the first years of life, our final decades also represent a window of increased vulnerability. The history of exposure that comes with age means our body's chemical burden may be at its peak just as our biological systems gradually begin to weaken and slow. **We can do something about this – we can stop using pesticides and herbicides** [Photograph of County Monaghan wildflowers by Fearghal Duffy, for more beautiful photos of local biodiversity follow him on Twitter at @FearghaRua]
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    Created by Transition Monaghan Picture
  • Refuse GAA request for additional development on public land at Pairc Ui Chaoimh
    The GAA have already been sold public land for development which included conditions and contributions that haven't been fully met by the GAA including providing public lighting along The Marina. This park was intended be kept as a green space including a children's play area which has also not materialised. There has been considerable loss of habitat already due to development and building further on public land should be outright refused. Surrounding areas suffer greatly from significant traffic and illegal parking on match days, however provision of 124 extra spaces should not and will not be for public use during match days. Offering alternatives to people driving to the stadium should be the first priority. Solutions include better walking and cycling routes on match days such as road closures for non-locals and/or a GAA funded shuttle bus from the city centre. As the stadium is a 30 minute walk from the city there should be no extra motor vehicles being diverted towards the area. A "fan zone" with food trucks can be setup on the existing parking and paved space that exists on the Eastern side of the stadium should it be needed.
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    Created by Harry Murphy
  • Stop the Research on Drilling for Oil and Gas in Northern Ireland
    Consultancy firm Hatch Regeneris have been funded by the Department for the Economy to carry out a £65,000 piece of research on the economic, environmental and social impact of drilling for oil and gas here. They were awarded the contract one day after the Northern Ireland Assembly unanimously passed a motion for a halt on oil and gas drilling and development in Northern Ireland in October last year. https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-54144919 http://aims.niassembly.gov.uk/officialreport/report.aspx?&eveDate=2020%2F10%2F13&docID=310908 Despite the overwhelming evidence on the negative public health impact of drilling and fracking, the research does not include consideration of public health in its terms of reference. Now the Councils in the areas currently under the PLA1/16 licence, many of whom passed motions against fracking and drilling, are currently not part of their stakeholder engagement. This means that the communities that will bear the social impact of drilling for oil will not be heard.
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    Created by Nicola Browne
  • Public Bins needed in Haulbowline Amenity Park
    The Ringaskiddy Tidy towns was started in the middle of lockdown in 2020 as a direct result of the huge influx of visitors to the village and surrounding area. Unfortunately, an increase in visitors also meant an increase in rubbish, and after several weeks (and even months) of local volunteers collecting rubbish, the natural desire to increase the appearance of the village as a whole led to the establishment of a Tidy Towns group and committee. Together we have collected 2.3 tonnes of rubbish in the past 12 months, over 400kgs of glass bottles and transformed the village and the surrounding backroads and beaches. Five beautiful old boats filled with plants and maintained by volunteers now adorn the village in strategic places. Huge planting and weeding projects have been undertaken successfully in the core of the village. But for every thing we “prettify” every week we encounter illegal dumping, dog fouling, people leaving their coffee cups wherever they please , and so on. This has only been exacerbated by the opening of Haulbowline Amenity Park. We understand from a post on Facebook last month by Seamus McGrath TD that the wrong bins were installed at a cost to Cobh Municipal Council, and that they have no plans to install the correct bins. It is not the fault of the residents of Ringaskiddy if unsuitable bins were installed . “Encouraging” people to take their waste home is not going to work. The idea that a public park would not have public bins in simply unworkable. Whilst we were all still being encouraged to stay within our 5kms locals stopped going to the new park due to the levels of dog fouling. We’ve provided bins of our own volition to our two local beaches, but we cannot maintain the new park by ourselves. I’ve seen in an article published today on the Examiner’s Facebook page that Cobh Municipal Council seem to still be talking about the issue, meanwhile rubbish is being thrown into the sea, the county is opening to travel tomorrow, which may lead to more visitors to the area, and the summer is coming. We cannot wait any longer.
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    Created by Noelle Nally
  • Save the rare wildlife at Craigall Rocks
    Craigall Rocks - an escarpment with giant boulders and stunted woodland - was one of the most important sites for rare plants in County Derry . It is the last known location for Wood small-reed in Northern Ireland, and also holds old records for scarce wildflowers like Small white orchid and Intermediate wintergreen. As a result, it was designated as a Site of Local Nature Conservation Importance, but this has done nothing to protect the site from quarrying - which is able to take place under an archaic planning permission that predates most of our environmental legislation. There are signs that the woodland on Craigall Rocks may be Ancient (around since at least 1650): - many of the trees are clearly old and gnarly, with thick stools and many stems; - there is a huge diversity of woodland wildflowers; - and old woodland-associated lichens are present. Ancient Woodland is extremely rare in Northern Ireland, covering only 0.08% of our land surface. The surviving area of natural boulderfield and possibly Ancient Woodland at Craigall Rocks is tiny, spanning around an acre. There is still plenty of space to expand the quarry without destroying this precious and irreplaceable habitat.
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    Created by Nicola Browne
  • 'Dogs On Leash' Signs needed for Seabury parks in Malahide
    - Off-leash dogs are a potential danger to everyone, including toddlers and children who can easily be knocked over or even attacked. - Off-leash dogs are causing a lot more dogs poo in the park area and nobody is cleaning it up. - We need signs to tell dog owners that they need to keep their dogs on a leash at certain times in Seabury public parks. - Please sign this petition if you agree. Fingal County Council - Regional Parks and Open Spaces Bye-Laws 2017 also states: "Dogs in parks and open spaces shall be kept on a leash, other than in areas designated as off-leash areas, or at times specified by the County Council. Dogs must be kept under effectual control at all times. Dogs (other than guide dogs or assistance dogs) shall not be permitted in public playgrounds. A person shall not cause or allow any Restricted Breed, as defined in the Control of Dogs Regulations 1998 (as amended) belonging to him/her, or in his/her charge to enter or remain in the park unless such dog is kept securely muzzled and led on a sufficiently strong leash or chain not exceeding two metres in length by a competent person over 16 years of age." (ref: https://www.woofadvisor.com/blog/off-leash-dog-parks-dublin-ireland/)
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    Created by Fiona OB Picture
  • Stop the N70 Milltown Co.Kerry Bypass
    To preserve the small businesses, environment and the history of a beautiful rural village on the Wild Atlantic Way. To prevent the scarring of rolling parkland of agriculture land and the obstruction of the views of the Slieve Mish Mountains by a raised roadway.
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    Created by Josephine Spring
  • Locals fight 'Winter Blues', with campaign for Dublin 8 Park Upgrade
    The lockdown has caused 'Winter Blues' for many families. Many children are 'climbing the walls' with only a few run-down local facilities in Dublin 8. Dog owners need places, to take their pets out for a daily walk. Parents with young children need clean playgrounds, as somewhere to go 'out of the house'. Joggers need somewhere clean & safe to exercise. We the undersigned ask Mr Les Moore, Head of Dublin City Council Parks Dept, to clean, fix and upgrade Grattan Crescent Park in Inchicore, for community wellbeing. We ask that Dublin City Council could clean and paint the park walls. The damaged signage needs to be replaced. The playground needs to be checked for health and safety issues. A community consultation needs to be organised to come up with a park upgrade plan.
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    Created by Zoe Obeimhen
  • Fast-tracking of a Bypass of Kilrane Village
    The fast-tracking of a bypass of Kilrane Village is crucial to the safety of the children of the area as Kilrane National School sits directly on the N25. Haulier traffic in the port increased 500% in the first week of Brexit. The increase in traffic since Brexit we believe also creates many current problems and potential future problems in the development of Kilrane Village and for the quality of life of the residents of the village and surrounding area. We believe that the issues highlighted in the attached full petition cover the concerns of the residents of Kilrane and the surrounding area. The full detailed petition can be viewed at this link: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Ty7ADK6uwvOKAdAA79xuz_rkg7FrnTbc/view?usp=sharing
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    Created by Eoin Ó Donnagáin - Kilrane NS
  • Don't allow Texaco to Use Our Children
    Courts in Ecuador found that Chevron-Texaco had deliberately dumped 16 billion gallons of cancer-causing toxic oil waste into the rainforest, causing a cancer epidemic that has killed thousands and has decimated five indigenous nations who are teetering on the brink of extinction. They inflicted death and devastation on communities of people and wildlife that no fair-minded Irish person would ever tolerate. “The oil companies came to these pristine forests, backed by our own government. They took what they wanted and wiped-out cultures, completely disregarded the Indigenous people, killed animals and ruined sacred places. In the end, the people couldn’t do anything about it because they couldn’t speak the language of the people destroying their lives! The same destruction is still going on to this day.” Nina Gualinga, Indigenous campaigner for Ecuador Amazon Watch. Nina Gualinga, an indigenous environmental and human rights warrior from Ecuador. https://amazonwatch.org/news/2016/0715-toxic-tour Then, they fled Ecuador after a court had ordered them to pay $US9.5 billion in compensation to local communities. Ever since, they have threatened the communities they violated with a ‘lifetime of litigation’ unless they dropped the case. They have attacked their victims with retaliatory lawsuits. In the face of their inexcusable and catastrophic impact on the planet, fossil fuel companies like Chevron-Texaco are desperate for a ‘social-licence’ to operate. In parallel with their human-rights abuses in the Ecuadorian Amazon, Texaco were cynically running a ‘Children’s Art Competition’ here in Ireland while at the same time they were destroying children’s lives in the Amazon. The legacy of that destruction continues to this day. There can be no place for fossil fuel companies like Texaco in Children’s Art or Sports in Ireland. Join the growing number of major arts institutions and museums around the world who have severed their ties with major oil companies like Texaco.
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    Created by Just Forests