• Say No To Bottom Dredging Mussel Farm, Kinsale Harbour, Cork
    To date, 25 species of cetaceans have been recorded in Irish waters (Lusher at al., 2018). All cetaceans, pinnipeds; including harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) and the Eurasian otter (Lutra lutra) are protected in Ireland under a range of national and international legislation. Under the Wildlife Act (1976) and amendments (2000, 2005, 2010 and 2012), it is an offence to intentionally hunt, injure, wilfully interfere with or disturb or destroy the resting or breeding place of a protected species (except under licence or permit from the department). The 1976 Wildlife Act applies out to the 12 nm limit of Irish territorial waters. Additionally, all cetaceans, pinnipeds and otter and are protected under the EU Habitats Directive, where all cetaceans are included in Annex IV of the Directive as species ‘in need of strict protection’. Under this Directive, the harbour porpoise, bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus), grey seal, harbour seal and Eurasian Otter are listed under Annex II, which identifies these species of community interest and whose conservation requires the designation of Special Areas of Conservation (SACs) (O’ Brien, 2016). 3. Man-made noise generated from dredging operations, both from the physical presence of the dredger, and increased water turbidity within the area have potential to cause low levels of disturbance, including the masking of communication and induce behavioural impacts such as displacement from important habitat (O’Brien, 2016). Recently published literature on the impacts of dredging on marine mammals in Aberdeen Harbour found that bottlenose dolphins exhibited avoidance behaviour to dredging in a highly urbanised foraging patch, despite the expected high level of tolerance given the high level of vessel activity in the area (Pirotta et al., 2013). A similar review by Todd et al., (2014) found that in regard to dredging activities, the effect on marine mammals depends on the type of dredger used, state of operation, local sound propagation conditions and the receiver’s sensitivity and bandwidth of hearing. It also highlighted the potential for accidental collision with marine mammals. The review concluded that noise from dredging although perceived as being below the injury threshold for permanent hearing loss (PTS), according to criteria outlined in Southall et al., (2007), highlighted the potential for temporary damage to hearing (TTS) to marine mammals, such as the harbour porpoise after prolonged periods of exposure, also found in a more recent study (Kastelein et al., 2012). Indirect impacts from exposure of marine mammals to anthropogenic noise from dredging operations can result in changes to protected species physical environments, affecting prey distribution and introducing toxins and pollutants from dredge spoil.
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    Created by ORCireland Ocean Research & Conservation Ireland Picture
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    Created by Francisca Knight Picture
  • Use the vacant Dunnes site on Sarsfield St, Limerick city
    It’s important that this building is used so that the local authority’s plans to redevelop Limerick city’s waterfront can begin. It’s currently casting a shadow on any plans to further develop as per Limerick 2030. It lies vacant as a housing crisis continues unabated.
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    Created by Anne Cronin
  • Monasterevin Garda Station
    In recent years our town and its surrounding areas have expanded greatly due to increased housing development, while this is welcomed we also need a significant update of Garda presence. This is something that we as a community feel should be built on alongside our development and instead it has gone the opposite direction. we hope that with this petition, we can increase the presence of Garda in our area and reduce the anti-social behaviour. We also would like to see our station be opened more often for tasks such as forms being completed etc.
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    Created by Patricia Ryan Picture
  • RE-BUILD AND RE-OPEN GLENALBYN SWIMMING POOL - We want our 'Ring-Fenced' Funding Back
    The community of Stillorgan have been ignored for far too long. This pool is a vital part of our community. It is important for... OUR Physical and Mental Health The health and safety of our Children Swimming Lessons for our local school children Teaching our Adults how to SWIM Teaching the Swimmers how to SAVE LIVES Training Olympic and Special Olympic Swimmers, Training our Championship Swimmers and world record holders. Our Deep water and Scuba Divers. Our Water Polo teams Our Fitness and Rehabilitation Non Impact exercise for those unable for high impact exercise. Long distance lane swimming. Aqua Aerobics Swimming for fitness and pleasure. Local community social gatherings Local Jobs and so much more Glenalbyn was more than just a fun space to splash about in. It provided VITAL services for our community and beyond. Ignoring the wishes of the Stillorgan has gone on for far too long. All our elected council representatives voted on MONDAY THE 11TH OF FEBRUARY to keep ring-fenced funding and put motions forward calling to rebuild our facility urgently. We are calling on DLRCOCO to honor their commitments to the people they serve and reinstate the ring-fenced funds and begin the redevelopment of our pool immediately. We have waited long enough.
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    Created by Friends Of Glenalbyn Picture
  • Get Galway moving in 2020
    Imagine if Ireland was able to implement a single policy that could reduce traffic, combat climate change, let people take up jobs they couldn’t before, make life in rural Ireland easier and reduce the cost of living all at once. And it only took a year or two to get it up and running. It may sound too good to be true but free public transport could do all this and we want to pilot it in Galway during 2020. Dear Minister Ross, Minister Bruton, and Minister Donohue, We, the people of Galway, ask you to trial free-fare public transport in Galway during 2020. This a policy that has been piloted across Europe and is working. In Aubagne, a French city of 100,000 people, public transport ridership increased by 142% and car trips decreased by 10% once free public transport was introduced. Overall, there was a reduction in public expenditure per journey of 48% from €3.93 to €2.04. This policy of fare-free public transport could allow the following outcomes across Ireland: * Reduction in traffic and commute time in cities and counties * Reducing our climate emissions and contributing towards our stated ambition to make Ireland a leader in tackling climate change * Increased economic activity and lower social welfare costs through improved social mobility and access to jobs and lower cost housing * Improved rural mobility with better public transport options in rural Ireland * Reduced cost of living through lower fares and giving families the option of giving up second cars With Galway welcoming the world to the European Capital of Culture in 2020, and our well-documented traffic problems, Galway 2020 is the perfect place and time to pilot this policy. We respectfully request that the Department of Transport and Department of Climate Action would immediately begin design and costing a pilot for free-fare public transport in Galway during 2020 and that the Department of Finance would allocate for this pilot in the 2020 Finance Bill or as part of the Climate Action Fund. We would ask that this pilot allows for: * An increase in bus capacity in Galway city and county so that buses are more frequent and reliable * A redesign of the route network including multiple crossings of the bridges and avoiding all bus traffic going through the city centre * The addition of new buses designs with modern interiors (similar to BRT designs like Glider in Belfast) that make the bus experience more pleasant * A proper study of the economic, environmental and social outcomes of the pilot. We are available to meet with you at your earliest convenience to outline our request and work with you to make it happen. Yours sincerely, Galway Free Public Transport Campaign
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    Created by Niall Ó Tuathail Picture
  • Stop The Children's Hospital
    We need to have a conversation about its location, size, facilities, and cost. If we, the people, are to spend €2 billion, we need to be consulted about how our money is being spent. The hospital, as currently scoped, is not sized for the current population. It will not be coastguard helicopter accessible in cases of emergency. Co-located with a maternity hospital would be desirable. There is no denying that we need and want the best of care for our children, but the Children's Hospital project in its current runaway state, is dangerously close to making us the laughing stock of the world. We demand more transparency and accountability. Re-open the discussion on location. Rigorously consult the people now.
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    Created by Maryrose Lyons Picture
  • Save Kilkenny's Historic Tholsel From Corporate Vandalism.
    The Tholsel or Town Hall in Kilkenny city is a public building and a protected structure, classified as 'a substantial edifice of national significance, forming an imposing centre piece in High Street'. We, the people of Kilkenny, love it. We love its public Arcade that welcomes musicians, artists, craftspeople, jugglers, carol singers and the Crib at Christmas, art exhibitions in the summer and meetings, remembrances, public gatherings and community fundraising events all year round. This is Kilkenny's public space, our Agora. We don't want it enclosed, reduced in size, or glassed in for use as a ticket office, or anything else. We're also proud of the ceremonial staircase within the building. We don't want to lose this either. It's part of who we are, part of the Tholsel that we love. Leave it alone.
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    Created by Margaret O Brien Picture
  • Bring Back Barista Bus
    The Barista Bus is a locally owned micro business that traded from a small patch of privately owned land across from Blackrock tower, which they had rented from the owner legitimately since the summer of 2018. Due to the city council claiming the bus was an unauthorized development (though it is mobile and temporary) the local business was told to cease trading as the area is zoned residential. Recently four very large concrete blocks were placed at the little site opposite Blackrock, presumably to prevent access to the site, following press coverage and public outcry the blocks were removed. Barista Bus is a homegrown enterprise that has become part of the community and the charm of Salthill. Swimmers, walkers, locals and tourists alike were delighted with this addition to the Blackrock area. Galway city councils approach to planning is discouraging start-up enterprises and innovation from endeavoring to try something new. Our council should be doing everything in its power to encourage flourishing indigenous start-ups. We find it incredibly difficult to believe that anyone other than the council have the means, ability or will to place and/or remove giant concrete blocks as were placed on the site to prevent Barista Bus from accessing it. The councils methods of dealing with issues such as this, especially in cases dealing with private land, is entirely archaic. We are calling on the council to reverse their decision, to grant retention and/or allow for an exemption on this small patch of land, to allow the Barista Bus to resume trading. How can you help? Start by signing the petition which will be presented to Galway City Council, but also contact your local representatives
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    Created by John Crowley Picture
  • No more Student and Transient Accommodation
    There is an over-concentration of student and transient accommodation in the Dublin Inner City. With regards to student accommodation, the city development plan states that the planning authority “will have regard to the pattern and distribution of student accommodation in the locality and resist the over concentration of such schemes in any one area”. In Dublin 8 alone the total number of student bed spaces in schemes either already inplace, under construction, approved or proposed within 250 metres of the proposed Sweeney Corner development is 1058. Extending the radius to 1km brings the total to 3752 bed spaces. In addition to student bed spaces, almost exclusively all other development in the area are providing for transient accommodation. This includes hotels recently built, under construction of approved at Kevin Street (Maldron), directly adjacent at Mill Street (Aloft), the Coombe (Hyatt), Vicar Street and Newmarket, as well as Staycity aparthotels directly adjacent and approved for the Tivoli site on Francis Street. Finally, 2 other sites in the immediate vicinity of Blackpitts and Donore Avenue which have planning approval in place for an apartment and office scheme respectively, are now back on the market advertising their suitability for hotel and/or student accommodation. Although the application in question at Sweeney’s Terrace provides for a number of build-to-rent apartments, it is still primarily a development of student accommodation. At this stage, it must be considered that there is sufficient student accommodation in the area, and accommodation of a more permanent nature must be encouraged in order to provide an appropriate diversity of accommodation types.
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    Created by Ronan Evers-Norton
  • Turn the old church in Macroom into a music and arts venue
    Macroom lacks a proper music venue at the moment. Now more than ever we need to encourage visitors to our town and a proper music venue could help us become a desirable destination. Churches make wonderful arts venues - look at Live at St. Luke's, St. Canice's in Kilkenny, or how the Other Voices festival has revitalised Dingle town through using the old church there for intimate concerts. Local music fans would get to see touring musicians on their doorstep and local musicians would finally have a place to perform. It could also be used as an art gallery for local and other artists.
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    Created by Síle Ní Dhubhghaill Picture
  • Flemington Recreation Centre campaign
    There are other compelling reasons for Parks Department of Fingal Council to develop this space for recreation use. They are: - provide green space for Balbriggan ETNS school, Foroige and afterschool - space for young people to hang out, instead of within the nearby estates - a minipitch/ multi use games area would nicely complete this space - minipitch/ games area would provide an asset to Fingal Council's Balbriggan Sports Hub, which is based at Flemington Community Centre - many estates in the surrounding area do not have green spaces within, so this space could be put to good use in day time and evening time hours Please sign and share with your friends and neighbours!
    275 of 300 Signatures
    Created by Garrett Mullan
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