• 30% Recall Pledge
    Time to end the wholesale lying to get elected and the voracious corruption once elected. We should be able to sack underperforming or misbehaving TDs.
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    Created by Alistair Smith Picture
  • Cycle lane along coast from Dun Laoghaire to Blackrock (Booterstown)
    We need a safe place for our children and adults to cycle on the road for commuting to school and work. This would also provide for recreational cycling and people to enjoy the coast in a safe and peaceful manner. At the moment there is no continuous safe cycling for people in DLR. Most people currently don't cycle due to the dangerous nature of the roads in DLR. This could provide an impetus for cycling with a link all the way from Booterstown to Sandycove. There's been talk of a cycleway along the coast for over 20 years and still no sign of it.
    546 of 600 Signatures
    Created by Sean Barry Picture
  • Make the traffic lights in Raheny village pedestrian friendly
    The traffic lights at Raheny village are anti-pedestrian and punish people who travel on foot - particularly older people, young children and people with disabilities. This must change immediately.
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    Created by Paddy Monahan
  • Trial a cycle path on Dublin’s quays in 2020
    Plans have been mulled for years to try to keep everybody happy. But an apparent solution made public in May 2019 includes removal of rows of trees, narrowing footpaths, interfering with historic bridge walls, and even the removal of some existing pedestrian crossings. And for what? The draft plans show a route which is not continuous, leaves people cycling exposed at junctions, and looks too narrow for current demand in cycling. Often a lack of funding is given as a reason for delaying projects, but the Liffey Cycle Route has mainly suffered an issue with “politics of space” — mostly a fear of removing cars from parts of the quays despite international examples showing that this is the way to go.  This is as much about what kind of capital city Ireland wants as it is about cycling: A car-dominated city centre or enabling sustainable transport which is better for transport capacity, health, the local air quality, and even climate change -- which is better for local residents, business, workers and tourism.   Cycling has increased in Dublin in the last decade but the creation of safe and attractive cycle routes has remained stalled long after economic recovery while at the same time extra lanes have been added to motorways near the city. Rather then keep spending years of planning each route, Dublin needs to start a quick-build network and there's no better place to start than the quays which connects so much of the city. We are asking that city and national authorities go back to the previous plan of continuous two-way cycle path on the quays to at least trial it for 8-12 months and then ask if people want to go back to the way things are now. MORE DETAILS:  How a two-way cycle path on the north quays can be trialed -- Can Dublin #GreenTheQuays if it means disrupting car traffic?: https://irishcycle.com/2019/08/06/can-dublin-greenthequays-if-it-means-disrupting-car-traffic/ How the NTA’s plan for the Liffey Cycle Route is on the wrong path for Dublin’s future: https://irishcycle.com/2019/05/22/liffey-cycle-route-is-on-the-wrong-path-for-dublins-future/ ‬ ‬ Motor traffic around Dublin's River Liffey quays shocked international cycling experts https://irishcycle.com/2019/12/09/motor-traffic-around-dublins-river-liffey-quays-shocked-international-cycling-experts/ Liffey Cycle Route: Timeline and coverage: https://irishcycle.com/2019/12/10/liffey-cycle-route-timeline-and-coverage/
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    Created by Cian Ginty Picture
  • Save fences for safety and security of our families
    Kilminchy residents story. We couple of residents from kilminchy estate received an enforcement letter from laois county council to remove our fences from front of the house due to complaint some jealous person made to laois county council. Due to rise of antisocial behaviour in the estate we decided to get fences for our front of house for the safety and security of our families. After getting informations from garda siochona and laois county council regarding exempted developments we got a fence in front of our houses. Later on we received an enforcement notice to remove the fence and have been harassed by council since than on the basis of complaint made by someone who is obviously only jealous and have nothing better to do.There is not much to go into details but whoever is familiar with this situation would completely understand what we have been going through.Spoken to laois county council if nobody make a complain which only take few minutes to make your life so stressful and miserable they can turn an blind eye on it. We would like to see some changes regarding enforcement law as it's very unfair on the person who gets reported by someone who is taking advantage and misusing this law. We residents of kilminchy estate would like to get support from as many people as possible to keep our fences for our families safety and our houses. Please do support us as your support can make a change.
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    Created by Kilminchy Resident
  • Road Safety for Monasterevin School Children
    With an ever increasing population and heavier traffic on our roads, the current layout around the Monasterevin Schools is unacceptable. Every day, children are crossing roads that have no designated crossing. They are walking on the road because the footpath is unusable or non existent. They are using a junction that is too wide to cross safely with traffic coming from all directions. There are no signs to indicate a school. The current buildup of leaves is leading to ice like conditions on the roads and footpaths. The list of issues goes on and on.. Kildare County Council have refused to provide a traffic warden as recently as November 18th, and with the dark winter already upon us, our childrens lives are quite literally on the line. KCC have quite simply said no money will be spent on our childrens safety. With money widely spent across the county on traffic wardens and infrastructure, Monasterevin appears to once again be forgotten or deemed less important by Kildare County Council. We will NOT accept this. The School Road Safety Action Group, will continue to highlight this issue and will not relent until we are confident that our children can safely walk to school.
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    Created by Monasterevin School Road Safety Action Group
  • Access to Justice
    VERY IMPORTANT to stop this legislation by Minister Murphy as it will effect our ability to take a court case/ judicial review. Environmental groups outline shock at proposed planning Bill. Proposed legislative changes would make it almost impossible for citizens and environmental groups to challenge poor planning decisions in the courts. Ireland’s leading environmental coalition is shocked at the Minister for Housing’s attempt to introduce new planning legislation that would make it near impossible to challenge planning decisions in the courts and hold public authorities and the Government to account. The Environmental Pillar – a coalition of national environmental organisations – learned over the weekend of worrying developments with the Housing and Planning and Development Bill 2019 that is being brought forward by Minister Eoghan Murphy TD. In sum, the proposed Bill will add numerous challenging requirements and restrictions that will make it very hard for ordinary citizens and environmental NGOs to achieve the necessary “standing” to take cases. The changes proposed in the Bill would also add to the complexity of the court process and increases the risks of exposure to significant costs to those seeking to challenge bad planning decisions. This legislation would row back on major changes introduced just a few years ago to enable ordinary people, their organisations, and environmental NGOs to challenge bad environmental decisions. Those changes were already long overdue and necessary to comply with EU law and the Aarhus Convention. The Heads of the Bill sent to the Joint Oireachtas Committee for Housing, Planning and Local Government last week are very blunt that the proposed changes are designed to make it more difficult to engage in the legal process and appears to favour developer’s interests at the cost of environmental rights. The most worrying aspects (some of which are further explored below) of the proposed Bill are: • Complete change to existing cost rules for environmental cases from a system where costs should “not be prohibitively expensive” to a cost cap rules system with court discretion. This exposes the public and eNGOs to much higher costs and uncertainty, ensuring that many will be dissuaded from bringing a case in the first place and makes it harder to engage lawyers • Change in standing rights requirements for applicants from “sufficient interest” to “substantial interest” and a requirement that they must be “directly affected by a proposed development” and “in a way which is peculiar or personal”. This is in addition to a new requirement that the applicant must have had prior participation in the planning process. • Extension of the minimum time that an NGO must be in existence before it can challenge a planning decision from 12 months to 3 years, thereby essentially ruling out newly established citizen-led NGOs concerned with local environmental issues from bringing challenges • Insertion of a new requirement that NGOs must have a minimum of 100 affiliated members, thereby ruling out the vast majority of Irish groups from bringing challenges. • Increased requirements for the “leave” stage (where you get court permission to challenge). The Heads of the Bill propose going back to the abandoned “on notice” system and adding to the tests and complexity of the leave – this adds to the costs, duration and difficulty of court proceedings. “This legislation would row back on major changes introduced just a few years ago to enable ordinary people and small but committed environmental NGOs to legally challenge bad environmental decisions, without fear of incurring eye-watering costs and extensive obstacles to accessing justice.” “The explanation for the Bill is blatant about making it harder to challenge decisions, with the Department arguing that challenges cause delays. It is bad decisions, and flawed legislation however, that are the real issue driving litigation in this country and this Bill does nothing to address that. “Given the context of costs in our Irish planning system, the size and nature of organisations and the costs in our courts, this Bill is an extermination of environmental democracy and oversight. It is particularly chilling that it comes at a time when environmental protection has never been more important, and citizens and groups are mobilising in a powerful Green Wave given the endless failures of this Government and administration.
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    Created by Donna Cooney Picture
  • James Joyce House for cultural heritage NOT a 56 bed hostel
    15 Ushers Island is also called the House of the Dead. The building got this name, because it is the setting of the last short story, in Dubliners written by James Joyce. The house is of value to future generations and to scholars. It is of national and global cultural importance. DCC failed to purchase the house in 2017 when it was for sale. Action must be taken immediately by the council, to restore the building to good condition and national ownership. We the undersigned object to the planning permission for a 56 bed hostel at 15 Ushers Island, due to these reasons. We also hope a cultural plan for the centenary of Ulysses could be put in place for the house and surrounding area.
    1,645 of 2,000 Signatures
    Created by Zoe Obeimhen Picture
  • Protect Galway Market From Flooding
    Market traders are experiencing a number of difficulties in our working conditions. We are dismayed and disappointed at the negative response from the Council. It is clear to us that there is no appreciation or understanding of the importance and value of the market to the city. Severe flooding in Churchyard Street , where Galway Market is located, has become a worsening issue over the past few years and gullies regularly overflow on rainy days, resulting in dismal conditions for both traders and visitors. It is becoming increasingly difficult for the traders to protect their stock and to maintain a business. As well as the flooding issues, loose paving stones in the area are a trip hazard for traders and public alike. We recently discovered that the Galway market area is excluded from the upgrading of the city centre pedestrianised zone and there is no plans to resurface the area or carry out much needed repair work to clear overloaded drains. These drains are connected to the mains sewerage system and when they overflow, they are a very unsavoury health hazard to the traders and the public. Despite repeated requests to the City Manager we have been unable to obtain a meeting with him or senior officials to discuss our issues. We urgently need to address this issue, which has become not only a hindrance to business but also a matter of public safety. This is a video about the situation - https://youtu.be/03MdmAeW97M
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    Created by Maeve Kelly Picture
  • Bus for 22 Students from Ballygarrett & Killenagh to Creagh College, Gorey
    There are 22 children in the Killenagh/Ballygarrett area seeking school transport to Creagh College in Gorey, approximately 16km away. Half of the parents in our group have already built their lives around the fact that the children can be brought to Creagh College by the School Transport system. Some of these children are going into 6th year. This is an additional stress on an already stressful year for any student. We’ve looked into private busses and it is simply not affordable at €40-€50 per week per child. Some families have 3 children in the school and most of us will have multiple children over the coming years. We have been advised that €4m would solve this situation nationally. We need a solution locally in two weeks. We need action NOW!! #22forcreaghbus
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    Created by Tina Regan Picture
  • Save Clondalkin Convent
    Clondalkin is over 1,000 years old and is attracting more and more visitors to view its heritage. In this regard the proposed nursing home is wholly inappropriate. The four storey building would block the view of the limestone convent while the proposed brick finish is not at all in keeping with local architecture. In addition an antique stone wall on Convent Rd., would be knocked not to mention the additional traffic that would ensue in an already gridlocked village. The grounds and cloisters of the convent include an endangered species of bird, the Swift, which would be threatened by the construction. Such a development would detrimentally affect the historic character of Clondalkin and one of its most important heritage sites.
    1,410 of 2,000 Signatures
    Created by Clondalkin Village
  • Support High Rise and High Density Development in the Port of Cork
    The key to unlocking Cork’s potential is building high density and high rise development in and near the city centre. The Docklands and Tivoli will be key areas for this type of development, but we need to look at all our options within a reasonable distance of the city centre. High rise and high density developments in the city centre, both residential and business allow for: Less Traffic: People will be able to walk or cycle to work, taking cars off the roads and reducing traffic congestion. More people work in a concentrated area in the city centre, justifying more buses and better cycle lanes on these key routes. Increasing supply in the housing market: Apartments are seriously lacking in Cork and high rise apartment building, while they won't solve the housing crisis, will provide a much needed injection of supply and will free up houses in the suburbs that are now being occupied by young professionals, etc, who would prefer to live near to the city centre. Better public transport decisions: High density development facilitates us in upgrading and developing our public transport. It makes a Cork Luas feasible. We’ve already seen this in Ballincollig & Carrigaline- the density along the 220 bus route has allowed it to become a very successful 24 hour route. Better public transport will breathe life into the city centre- if people are less reliant on their cars, they are more likely to go for a pint after work, venture into town for a coffee on a Saturday, or go in to check out a festival or an event in the Crawford, Triskel or the Everyman. I’ve already seen this happening with people that work with me from Carrigaline and Crosshaven and can get that 220 route- town has suddenly become much more accessible. Avoiding sprawl: I have friends from Madrid to Berlin that live in apartments right in the city centre, and all those European cities, living in a city centre apartment is the norm through all stages in life. What I REALLY want to avoid in Cork is the sprawl that Dublin has suffered from. We do not want Cork City sprawling out and people being forced to put their children into the creche at 6am and commute for hours to get to work. We have the chance now to avoid this, by building up. At the moment, it isn’t happening. Looking upwards will help us solve a lot of problems.
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    Created by Julie O'Leary Picture