• Do not rename Anglesea Street in Cork
    A decision has been made to rename Anglesea Street Terence McSwiney Street. This should not be allowed to happen. My family lived on Anglesea Street for over a century. Are previous dwellers of Anglesea Street, like the Burkes, the Cuthberts, the Murphys, the Heaphys, the Connollys, the Carberys, the Hayes, the Bowes, the O'Neills, the Leahys, to have their history obliterated due to an omission by the Council to mark McSwiney's name in some other way during the past 100 years. Reserve the name of Terence McSwiney for another street and do not rob our families and neighbours of our past.
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    Created by Clare Lynch Picture
  • Make Raheny crossroads safe for pedestrians
    Dublin City Council must make Raheny crossroads safe for pedestrians. The Council must remove the filtering lane for cars turning left at Raheny Church. This lane is lethally dangerous as cars routinely ignore the green man. It is only a matter of time before there is a tragedy. The filtering lane serves no function for pedestrians other than to needlessly add another set of traffic lights to their journey. Removing the filtering lane means pedestrians will no longer have to cross the road in two stages, stopping on the traffic island. The traffic island is nobody's destination so why do pedestrians have to wait there? Cars need only one green light to proceed so why do pedestrians have to get two green men to cross the road fully? There is no filtering lane or traffic island at any other corner of the crossroads and vehicles are perfectly capable of turning left at each of those corners. Why should it be any different at the corner at Raheny Church? It is time we started to prioritise sustainable transport. This is something Dublin City Council says it is committed to. It is time for the Council to live up to its fine words.
    283 of 300 Signatures
    Created by Paddy Monahan
  • Re-open the NCAD community Garden
    Because we all liked it the way it was ! And It was also a resource for locals in the D8 area who aren't students at the college; be they people from the flats, students from other colleges, unemployed, former drug addicts, you name it.
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    Created by octavian fitzherbert
  • Free Dublin land reserved for Eastern Bypass motorway to be used for Housing and Public Transport
    The short version: Land in the East Wall and Booterstown areas of Dublin is reserved for a hypothetical Eastern Bypass motorway (one with extremely negative environmental consequences). Dublin City Council want to rezone the East Wall land for housing. The Booterstown corridor could be used as a public transport corridor instead. But the Eastern Bypass' status in national planning documents means both of those critical needs are being blocked. We want the government and relevant authorities to change this by admitting that the Eastern Bypass is a permanently dead project, removing it from planning, and allowing the land to be used for something worthwhile. Long version: Dublin's Eastern Bypass was always a massive environmental issue — it is planned to be built across Sandymount Strand to provide an extension of the M50 motorway, for very limited benefit. The construction of this motorway is now also likely illegal under Irish government climate objectives and obligations, just as the 3rd Heathrow runway in the UK was recently declared to be illegal. Ireland is already likely to face fines because of our failure to reduce emissions, and the expansion of car usage is absolutely at odds with that target. The reserved space for the Eastern Bypass is also now blocking the construction of housing in Dublin city by preventing rezoning, as outlined in the Irish Times: https://www.irishtimes.com/news/social-affairs/housing-plan-in-dublin-halted-to-facilitate-eastern-bypass-1.4189623 The Eastern Bypass is extremely unlikely to ever be built — the environmental consequences of the proposed road alone massively outweigh the very minor benefits it might bring to car drivers. It has been kicked around for 50 years with truly minimal progress. It is so politically, fiscally, environmentally, and socially toxic that it almost 100% guarantees no government will ever even try to build it. So why are we continuing to retain it in our plans and therefore stop the reserved land being freed up? That reserved land is, at this point, merely blocking other types of useful development to facilitate a dead project. Most outrageously, the reserved land is also preventing the construction of homes in a housing crisis (as seen in the Irish Times article linked above). Most of the reserved land on the Sandyford to Booterstown alignment would be absolutely ideal for use in constructing a high-quality rapid bus corridor (connecting the Luas and the DART), or providing the space for a Luas spur that could serve countless new homes and the students of UCD. The Irish government, Dublin City Council, and Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council must immediately work to remove this outdated, unwanted project from their plans, and allow the land to be reused.
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    Created by Matthew Johnston Picture
  • 30% Recall Pledge
    Time to end the wholesale lying to get elected and the voracious corruption once elected. We should be able to sack underperforming or misbehaving TDs.
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    Created by Alistair Smith Picture
  • Cycle lane along coast from Dun Laoghaire to Blackrock (Booterstown)
    We need a safe place for our children and adults to cycle on the road for commuting to school and work. This would also provide for recreational cycling and people to enjoy the coast in a safe and peaceful manner. At the moment there is no continuous safe cycling for people in DLR. Most people currently don't cycle due to the dangerous nature of the roads in DLR. This could provide an impetus for cycling with a link all the way from Booterstown to Sandycove. There's been talk of a cycleway along the coast for over 20 years and still no sign of it.
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    Created by Sean Barry Picture
  • Make the traffic lights in Raheny village pedestrian friendly
    The traffic lights at Raheny village are anti-pedestrian and punish people who travel on foot - particularly older people, young children and people with disabilities. This must change immediately.
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    Created by Paddy Monahan
  • Trial a cycle path on Dublin’s quays in 2020
    Plans have been mulled for years to try to keep everybody happy. But an apparent solution made public in May 2019 includes removal of rows of trees, narrowing footpaths, interfering with historic bridge walls, and even the removal of some existing pedestrian crossings. And for what? The draft plans show a route which is not continuous, leaves people cycling exposed at junctions, and looks too narrow for current demand in cycling. Often a lack of funding is given as a reason for delaying projects, but the Liffey Cycle Route has mainly suffered an issue with “politics of space” — mostly a fear of removing cars from parts of the quays despite international examples showing that this is the way to go.  This is as much about what kind of capital city Ireland wants as it is about cycling: A car-dominated city centre or enabling sustainable transport which is better for transport capacity, health, the local air quality, and even climate change -- which is better for local residents, business, workers and tourism.   Cycling has increased in Dublin in the last decade but the creation of safe and attractive cycle routes has remained stalled long after economic recovery while at the same time extra lanes have been added to motorways near the city. Rather then keep spending years of planning each route, Dublin needs to start a quick-build network and there's no better place to start than the quays which connects so much of the city. We are asking that city and national authorities go back to the previous plan of continuous two-way cycle path on the quays to at least trial it for 8-12 months and then ask if people want to go back to the way things are now. MORE DETAILS:  How a two-way cycle path on the north quays can be trialed -- Can Dublin #GreenTheQuays if it means disrupting car traffic?: https://irishcycle.com/2019/08/06/can-dublin-greenthequays-if-it-means-disrupting-car-traffic/ How the NTA’s plan for the Liffey Cycle Route is on the wrong path for Dublin’s future: https://irishcycle.com/2019/05/22/liffey-cycle-route-is-on-the-wrong-path-for-dublins-future/ ‬ ‬ Motor traffic around Dublin's River Liffey quays shocked international cycling experts https://irishcycle.com/2019/12/09/motor-traffic-around-dublins-river-liffey-quays-shocked-international-cycling-experts/ Liffey Cycle Route: Timeline and coverage: https://irishcycle.com/2019/12/10/liffey-cycle-route-timeline-and-coverage/
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    Created by Cian Ginty Picture
  • Save fences for safety and security of our families
    Kilminchy residents story. We couple of residents from kilminchy estate received an enforcement letter from laois county council to remove our fences from front of the house due to complaint some jealous person made to laois county council. Due to rise of antisocial behaviour in the estate we decided to get fences for our front of house for the safety and security of our families. After getting informations from garda siochona and laois county council regarding exempted developments we got a fence in front of our houses. Later on we received an enforcement notice to remove the fence and have been harassed by council since than on the basis of complaint made by someone who is obviously only jealous and have nothing better to do.There is not much to go into details but whoever is familiar with this situation would completely understand what we have been going through.Spoken to laois county council if nobody make a complain which only take few minutes to make your life so stressful and miserable they can turn an blind eye on it. We would like to see some changes regarding enforcement law as it's very unfair on the person who gets reported by someone who is taking advantage and misusing this law. We residents of kilminchy estate would like to get support from as many people as possible to keep our fences for our families safety and our houses. Please do support us as your support can make a change.
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    Created by Kilminchy Resident
  • Road Safety for Monasterevin School Children
    With an ever increasing population and heavier traffic on our roads, the current layout around the Monasterevin Schools is unacceptable. Every day, children are crossing roads that have no designated crossing. They are walking on the road because the footpath is unusable or non existent. They are using a junction that is too wide to cross safely with traffic coming from all directions. There are no signs to indicate a school. The current buildup of leaves is leading to ice like conditions on the roads and footpaths. The list of issues goes on and on.. Kildare County Council have refused to provide a traffic warden as recently as November 18th, and with the dark winter already upon us, our childrens lives are quite literally on the line. KCC have quite simply said no money will be spent on our childrens safety. With money widely spent across the county on traffic wardens and infrastructure, Monasterevin appears to once again be forgotten or deemed less important by Kildare County Council. We will NOT accept this. The School Road Safety Action Group, will continue to highlight this issue and will not relent until we are confident that our children can safely walk to school.
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    Created by Monasterevin School Road Safety Action Group
  • Access to Justice
    VERY IMPORTANT to stop this legislation by Minister Murphy as it will effect our ability to take a court case/ judicial review. Environmental groups outline shock at proposed planning Bill. Proposed legislative changes would make it almost impossible for citizens and environmental groups to challenge poor planning decisions in the courts. Ireland’s leading environmental coalition is shocked at the Minister for Housing’s attempt to introduce new planning legislation that would make it near impossible to challenge planning decisions in the courts and hold public authorities and the Government to account. The Environmental Pillar – a coalition of national environmental organisations – learned over the weekend of worrying developments with the Housing and Planning and Development Bill 2019 that is being brought forward by Minister Eoghan Murphy TD. In sum, the proposed Bill will add numerous challenging requirements and restrictions that will make it very hard for ordinary citizens and environmental NGOs to achieve the necessary “standing” to take cases. The changes proposed in the Bill would also add to the complexity of the court process and increases the risks of exposure to significant costs to those seeking to challenge bad planning decisions. This legislation would row back on major changes introduced just a few years ago to enable ordinary people, their organisations, and environmental NGOs to challenge bad environmental decisions. Those changes were already long overdue and necessary to comply with EU law and the Aarhus Convention. The Heads of the Bill sent to the Joint Oireachtas Committee for Housing, Planning and Local Government last week are very blunt that the proposed changes are designed to make it more difficult to engage in the legal process and appears to favour developer’s interests at the cost of environmental rights. The most worrying aspects (some of which are further explored below) of the proposed Bill are: • Complete change to existing cost rules for environmental cases from a system where costs should “not be prohibitively expensive” to a cost cap rules system with court discretion. This exposes the public and eNGOs to much higher costs and uncertainty, ensuring that many will be dissuaded from bringing a case in the first place and makes it harder to engage lawyers • Change in standing rights requirements for applicants from “sufficient interest” to “substantial interest” and a requirement that they must be “directly affected by a proposed development” and “in a way which is peculiar or personal”. This is in addition to a new requirement that the applicant must have had prior participation in the planning process. • Extension of the minimum time that an NGO must be in existence before it can challenge a planning decision from 12 months to 3 years, thereby essentially ruling out newly established citizen-led NGOs concerned with local environmental issues from bringing challenges • Insertion of a new requirement that NGOs must have a minimum of 100 affiliated members, thereby ruling out the vast majority of Irish groups from bringing challenges. • Increased requirements for the “leave” stage (where you get court permission to challenge). The Heads of the Bill propose going back to the abandoned “on notice” system and adding to the tests and complexity of the leave – this adds to the costs, duration and difficulty of court proceedings. “This legislation would row back on major changes introduced just a few years ago to enable ordinary people and small but committed environmental NGOs to legally challenge bad environmental decisions, without fear of incurring eye-watering costs and extensive obstacles to accessing justice.” “The explanation for the Bill is blatant about making it harder to challenge decisions, with the Department arguing that challenges cause delays. It is bad decisions, and flawed legislation however, that are the real issue driving litigation in this country and this Bill does nothing to address that. “Given the context of costs in our Irish planning system, the size and nature of organisations and the costs in our courts, this Bill is an extermination of environmental democracy and oversight. It is particularly chilling that it comes at a time when environmental protection has never been more important, and citizens and groups are mobilising in a powerful Green Wave given the endless failures of this Government and administration.
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    Created by Donna Cooney Picture
  • James Joyce House for cultural heritage NOT a 56 bed hostel
    15 Ushers Island is also called the House of the Dead. The building got this name, because it is the setting of the last short story, in Dubliners written by James Joyce. The house is of value to future generations and to scholars. It is of national and global cultural importance. DCC failed to purchase the house in 2017 when it was for sale. Action must be taken immediately by the council, to restore the building to good condition and national ownership. We the undersigned object to the planning permission for a 56 bed hostel at 15 Ushers Island, due to these reasons. We also hope a cultural plan for the centenary of Ulysses could be put in place for the house and surrounding area.
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    Created by Zoe Obeimhen Picture