• A Community Garden in the Clonskeagh/Dundrum Area
    The garden's aim is to produce local food and teach gardening techniques. Empowering people to produce their own food is especially important during this time of financial, societal and climate upheaval. The community garden will be totally run by volunteers, and consistently monitored by a committee. Benefits of Community Gardens Health Community gardens increase the public access to affordable, fresh, healthy food (1). People who participate in community gardens, on average, increase their fruit consumption by 10% (1) and areas with community gardens have less obesity (3). The act of gardening is a form of exercise and so participation in community gardens promotes physical activity (1,3). Urban agriculture is also linked to reductions in stress and positive mental health especially for those suffering from mental health problems (3). Community gardens generally promote public health and improve quality of life (1) Community Community gardens promote connection with the earth and with other people (7). Working with each other and sharing resources and time builds social relationships and stronger communities. Participation in community gardens is linked with increased voter registration, civic responsibility, and reduced rates of crime (3). Compared to other communal green spaces community gardens are small scale, low cost and highly used. Community garden areas of public parks see more visits than any other part of the park (2). Resilient Food System and Sustainability Urban agriculture increases food accessibility and local food security (3,1). This is of great significance to food insecure households (3). According to Safefood.eu, one in ten households in Ireland in 2018 suffered from food poverty (8). People who grow their own food, or are a part of a community garden save money by supplementing the food they buy (3). In Seattle growers were able to supplement their produce by 30-40% (3). Many urban agriculture projects produce more than they can consume and donate the excess food to community members and food banks (3). Increasing urban agriculture increases the resilience and sustainability of the city’s food system and reduces reliance on imported produce (3). This is especially relevant in the wake of the coronavirus. Local food is generally considered to be more sustainable because of the carbon cost associated with travel. Education Community gardens can be a great platform for skill shares and events like gardening workshops, and gardening tutoring, taste-testing events or discussion events (1). In one study 20% of students that started gardening in the community garden began gardening at home (1). Community gardens can be used by local schools. This is greatly beneficial for children as gardening helps develop fine motor skills and teaches them about patience, science and where their food comes from (2). Community gardens can host a variety of workshops and help people develop tangible agricultural and organisational skills (3). References 1.Community Gardens: Lessons Learned From California Healthy Cities and Communities | Joan Twiss, MA, Joy Dickinson, BS, CHES, Shirley Duma, MA, Tanya Kleinman, BA, Heather Paulsen, MS, and Liz Rilveria, MPA 2. Community Gardening By Katherine L. Adam NCAT Agriculture Specialist Published January 2011, 3.The Intersection of Planning, Urban Agriculture, and Food Justice: A Review of the Literature Megan Horst, Nathan McClintock & Lesli Hoey 4. Multifunctional Urban Agriculture for Sustainable Land Use Planning in the United States Sarah Taylor Lovell 5.Alma Anne Clavin (2011) Realising ecological sustainability in community gardens: a capability approach, Local Environment, 16:10, 945-962, DOI: 10.1080/13549839.2011.627320 6.The motivations and experiences of community garden participants in Edinburgh, Scotland David McVey, Robert Nash & Paul Stansbie 7.It takes a garden: Cultivating citizen-subjects in organized garden projects Mary BethPudup 8. https://www.safefood.eu/News/2019/New-research-reveals-households-on-low-incomes-need-to-spend-up-to-1-3-of-take-home-income-to-afford.aspx
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    Created by Saoirse Sheehy Ariff
  • Community Objection to a Quarry in Raphoe
    Bonar's Quarries are seeking permission for 25 years to open an old quarry that has already adversely affected the lives of residents of this heritage town under planning number 1952015. It has gone unnoticed by most of the community during the COVID-19 pandemic but those who remember the building damage, noise pollution, air pollution and misery caused when this quarry was last operated will not want it to return. Unbelievably, the proposal is within just 800 metres of some 23 homes, a secondary school, businesses, multiple farms and within 1 km of Raphoe, a heritage town with a population of over 1000 people and with huge historical and cultural significance. Raphoe is also home to three other schools, a cathedral, a chapel, churches, numerous businesses including a livestock mart, a tourism attraction in Oakfield Park, forestry and many farms. We oppose the noise, dust, vehicular traffic, the safety record of the applicant, water pollution, vibration, the location and the release of any poisonous landfill leachate into aquifers, and second the views of the 18 page objection already lodged. There are many more suitable locations for a quarry but this one, on the edge of our town, simply must not go ahead. Therefore we need as many people as possible to CLICK BELOW TO BACK THIS PETITION and oppose living beside a functioning quarry in Raphoe for the next 25 years.
    443 of 500 Signatures
    Created by Raphoe Community
  • Do not rename Anglesea Street in Cork
    A decision has been made to rename Anglesea Street Terence McSwiney Street. This should not be allowed to happen. My family lived on Anglesea Street for over a century. Are previous dwellers of Anglesea Street, like the Burkes, the Cuthberts, the Murphys, the Heaphys, the Connollys, the Carberys, the Hayes, the Bowes, the O'Neills, the Leahys, to have their history obliterated due to an omission by the Council to mark McSwiney's name in some other way during the past 100 years. Reserve the name of Terence McSwiney for another street and do not rob our families and neighbours of our past.
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    Created by Clare Lynch
  • Make Raheny crossroads safe for pedestrians
    Dublin City Council must make Raheny crossroads safe for pedestrians. The Council must remove the filtering lane for cars turning left at Raheny Church. This lane is lethally dangerous as cars routinely ignore the green man. It is only a matter of time before there is a tragedy. The filtering lane serves no function for pedestrians other than to needlessly add another set of traffic lights to their journey. Removing the filtering lane means pedestrians will no longer have to cross the road in two stages, stopping on the traffic island. The traffic island is nobody's destination so why do pedestrians have to wait there? Cars need only one green light to proceed so why do pedestrians have to get two green men to cross the road fully? There is no filtering lane or traffic island at any other corner of the crossroads and vehicles are perfectly capable of turning left at each of those corners. Why should it be any different at the corner at Raheny Church? It is time we started to prioritise sustainable transport. This is something Dublin City Council says it is committed to. It is time for the Council to live up to its fine words.
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    Created by Paddy Monahan
  • Re-open the NCAD community Garden
    Because we all liked it the way it was ! And It was also a resource for locals in the D8 area who aren't students at the college; be they people from the flats, students from other colleges, unemployed, former drug addicts, you name it.
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    Created by octavian fitzherbert
  • Free Dublin land reserved for Eastern Bypass motorway to be used for Housing and Public Transport
    The short version: Land in the East Wall and Booterstown areas of Dublin is reserved for a hypothetical Eastern Bypass motorway (one with extremely negative environmental consequences). Dublin City Council want to rezone the East Wall land for housing. The Booterstown corridor could be used as a public transport corridor instead. But the Eastern Bypass' status in national planning documents means both of those critical needs are being blocked. We want the government and relevant authorities to change this by admitting that the Eastern Bypass is a permanently dead project, removing it from planning, and allowing the land to be used for something worthwhile. Long version: Dublin's Eastern Bypass was always a massive environmental issue — it is planned to be built across Sandymount Strand to provide an extension of the M50 motorway, for very limited benefit. The construction of this motorway is now also likely illegal under Irish government climate objectives and obligations, just as the 3rd Heathrow runway in the UK was recently declared to be illegal. Ireland is already likely to face fines because of our failure to reduce emissions, and the expansion of car usage is absolutely at odds with that target. The reserved space for the Eastern Bypass is also now blocking the construction of housing in Dublin city by preventing rezoning, as outlined in the Irish Times: https://www.irishtimes.com/news/social-affairs/housing-plan-in-dublin-halted-to-facilitate-eastern-bypass-1.4189623 The Eastern Bypass is extremely unlikely to ever be built — the environmental consequences of the proposed road alone massively outweigh the very minor benefits it might bring to car drivers. It has been kicked around for 50 years with truly minimal progress. It is so politically, fiscally, environmentally, and socially toxic that it almost 100% guarantees no government will ever even try to build it. So why are we continuing to retain it in our plans and therefore stop the reserved land being freed up? That reserved land is, at this point, merely blocking other types of useful development to facilitate a dead project. Most outrageously, the reserved land is also preventing the construction of homes in a housing crisis (as seen in the Irish Times article linked above). Most of the reserved land on the Sandyford to Booterstown alignment would be absolutely ideal for use in constructing a high-quality rapid bus corridor (connecting the Luas and the DART), or providing the space for a Luas spur that could serve countless new homes and the students of UCD. The Irish government, Dublin City Council, and Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council must immediately work to remove this outdated, unwanted project from their plans, and allow the land to be reused.
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    Created by Matthew Johnston Picture
  • Third School for Gorey
    Due the shortage of secondary school places in Gorey
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    Created by Elaine O'Malley Clarke
  • SAVE Kilranelagh from Environmental Disaster
    This project will cause the complete destruction of one of the most historical and environmentally important areas in Ireland. Our aim is to protect our beautiful community and the families living within it. We want to raise awareness and give the people a voice. We are not against renewable energy, however, we will not stand for the environmental and archaeological destruction Ireland's Ancient East. Our Main Concerns: Noise Pollution - The proposed turbines will tower a mere 500 meters from the front doors of local residents. The noise of turbines of such scale would be unbearable for the many families who have lived on the peaceful untouched hillside for generations. Flicker Effect - The flickering shadow cast by the sun shining through the moving turbines would affect houses all across the area over an estimated distance of up to 2km. Destruction of Historical Sites and Monuments - The proposed development site is not only home to a Stone Circle, a number of Ringforts, Cairns, a Mound Barrow and an Ogham Stone, but is also home to one of Ireland's oldest graveyards and resting place of Sam McAllister. Environmental Impact - The devastation caused in the past by the construction of these gigantic wind turbines in Scotland and Galway, to name a few, has had a detrimental effect on the local environment. Not only was visible damage inflicted on the landscape, but also irreparable damage to the source of natural water supplies, the effects of which are still ongoing. Property Devaluation - Properties in the area and the surrounding areas will severely suffer as a result of the destruction of our natural environment, making many houses unsaleable. We need your support to save Kilranelagh hill in the heart of the Garden of Ireland. These lands must be protected for our future generations. If we don't put a stop to this now who is to say where this will ever stop.
    1,156 of 2,000 Signatures
    Created by James Carberry
  • 30% Recall Pledge
    Time to end the wholesale lying to get elected and the voracious corruption once elected. We should be able to sack underperforming or misbehaving TDs.
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    Created by Alistair Smith Picture
  • Cycle lane along coast from Dun Laoghaire to Blackrock (Booterstown)
    We need a safe place for our children and adults to cycle on the road for commuting to school and work. This would also provide for recreational cycling and people to enjoy the coast in a safe and peaceful manner. At the moment there is no continuous safe cycling for people in DLR. Most people currently don't cycle due to the dangerous nature of the roads in DLR. This could provide an impetus for cycling with a link all the way from Booterstown to Sandycove. There's been talk of a cycleway along the coast for over 20 years and still no sign of it.
    1,594 of 2,000 Signatures
    Created by Sean Barry
  • Make the traffic lights in Raheny village pedestrian friendly
    The traffic lights at Raheny village are anti-pedestrian and punish people who travel on foot - particularly older people, young children and people with disabilities. This must change immediately.
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    Created by Paddy Monahan
  • Trial a cycle path on Dublin’s quays in 2020
    Plans have been mulled for years to try to keep everybody happy. But an apparent solution made public in May 2019 includes removal of rows of trees, narrowing footpaths, interfering with historic bridge walls, and even the removal of some existing pedestrian crossings. And for what? The draft plans show a route which is not continuous, leaves people cycling exposed at junctions, and looks too narrow for current demand in cycling. Often a lack of funding is given as a reason for delaying projects, but the Liffey Cycle Route has mainly suffered an issue with “politics of space” — mostly a fear of removing cars from parts of the quays despite international examples showing that this is the way to go.  This is as much about what kind of capital city Ireland wants as it is about cycling: A car-dominated city centre or enabling sustainable transport which is better for transport capacity, health, the local air quality, and even climate change -- which is better for local residents, business, workers and tourism.   Cycling has increased in Dublin in the last decade but the creation of safe and attractive cycle routes has remained stalled long after economic recovery while at the same time extra lanes have been added to motorways near the city. Rather then keep spending years of planning each route, Dublin needs to start a quick-build network and there's no better place to start than the quays which connects so much of the city. We are asking that city and national authorities go back to the previous plan of continuous two-way cycle path on the quays to at least trial it for 8-12 months and then ask if people want to go back to the way things are now. MORE DETAILS:  How a two-way cycle path on the north quays can be trialed -- Can Dublin #GreenTheQuays if it means disrupting car traffic?: https://irishcycle.com/2019/08/06/can-dublin-greenthequays-if-it-means-disrupting-car-traffic/ How the NTA’s plan for the Liffey Cycle Route is on the wrong path for Dublin’s future: https://irishcycle.com/2019/05/22/liffey-cycle-route-is-on-the-wrong-path-for-dublins-future/ ‬ ‬ Motor traffic around Dublin's River Liffey quays shocked international cycling experts https://irishcycle.com/2019/12/09/motor-traffic-around-dublins-river-liffey-quays-shocked-international-cycling-experts/ Liffey Cycle Route: Timeline and coverage: https://irishcycle.com/2019/12/10/liffey-cycle-route-timeline-and-coverage/
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    Created by Cian Ginty