• Stop shutting out our vulnerable from our parks
    Everyone deserves to enjoy the beauty of a local park and that includes Daniel and his family. Dan has Sotos Syndrome and goes out daily with his amazing parents, Sinead and Keith for runs in his special buggy. Running the park, chatting to locals and saying hello has been a highlight, especially during C-19 as all day services etc. are closed. Now with these new gates, the Tighe family along with lots of other families are now PROHIBITED from entering our parks. This is wrong and SDCC need to remove this prison like gates and let those who are in wheelchairs etc. use the park like everyone else.
    794 of 800 Signatures
    Created by Sue O'Grady
  • Dublin's Health Emergency We need public toilet & hand washing facilities.
    My name is Richard Hanlon a co-owner of Busyfeet & Coco Cafe Dublin's oldest Fair-trade Cafe on South William street established in 2001. I would like to put in place 2 temporary toilets in Dublin’s city center and make them available to the public. This could be achieved in the coming days and could further this petition calling for immediate action on this critical matter from Dublin City Council. Under the road map to reopen Ireland’s society and economy we will move from Phase 1 to Phase 2 on June 8th. This will mean significantly increased movement of citizens and an influx to the city which will be a major event within Dublin. This also will be a key economic turning point for the Dublin city center commerce, but due to ongoing restrictions there will be no accessible toilet or handwashing facilities for the public to use till Phase 3 June 28th. When some hospitality  and retailers  could allow access to their loos. My concern is the lack of availability of public toilets in Dublin's city centre currently and into the future, with only 2 public toilets operational at Connelly & Hueston stations for a city of 650k people at this time. The current crisis has accentuated the urgent issue of the city’s poor hygiene infrastructure which will have an adverse effect on both public health and the survival of city centre commercial areas.  As an SME operator of coffee shops in both the city centre and suburbs, I am acutely aware of my customers requirement for easily accessible toilets. It is also very clear that the demands between the city and suburbs are vastly different during these times. People using suburban hospitality venues such as neighbourhood cafes for takeaway are within easy access of their own homes and bathroom facilities. The 20 days period between Phase 2 & 3 will be a pivotal time for businesses in the city, who badly need to reopen and help kickstart the economy. The “No Place to Go” feeling will be a negative consequence of having no temporary public toilets available from June 8th in Dublin city centre, making returning custom much less unlikely ‘A first impression is a lasting impression to a customer’.  In a survey more than half agreed that the lack of public toilets stopped them from going out as often as they would like. Any further loss to future trade in the coming months in the city centre will be devastating economically, pushing most businesses to bankruptcy. The ‘Urinary leash’ will not only hold back all of us from venturing into the city center but it will hold back the country.  There have been too many years of debating and deliberating about public toilets and in 2018 the Green Party hailed the achievement of 300k allocation of funds for public toilets, but this was never used and on the 25th May 2020 meetings with DCC called for temporary public toilets to be facilitated ahead of Phase 2 June 8th, but no budget or allocation could be agreed. Why is it so difficult to talk toilets in a modern age?  Dublin is Ireland’s economic engine and  250,000 people work in Dublin 1 and 2 alone.  On average, 300,000 people visit Dublin city centre each day, but with the expected drop in footfall due to working from home requirements, reduced transport capacity and social distancing the hospitality sector alone is looking to operate at a maximum of c.45% capacity.  We could be looking at up to 150,000 less people a day, which will mean the closure of many.  Without the hospitality sector there will be no adequate toilet facilities within Dublin City, so we must come up with a solution for both short term and long term so we can maintain Dublin City as an attractive destination.  City councillors and local politicians are eager to promote the rapid implementation of pedestrianisation of central zones and push for increased cycling as an important step to our future, even during this current health emergency. However, we should be reminded of our past where cycling and public toilets were commonplace and interlinked as we travelled further from our home privies.  Does the council want to add to the increased unsanitary practices which are currently taking place in the city? Does the council want to force the public into a situation in which they are unable to wash their hands, when the HSE & our Taoiseach are telling us that it is essential to public health? Who will return to the city centre, when they cannot find toilets and handwashing places during this COVID 19 crisis? Would you?  Without people, we have no commerce and Dublin has no future. Dublin City Council has to spend more than a penny now and act for the people of Dublin, so let's see them make a positive move soon and save our Dublin city’s heart from dirt, dereliction and disintegration.
    483 of 500 Signatures
    Created by Richard Hanlon
  • Sack Dominic Cummings
    Dominic Cummings has broken the lockdown rules, at a time when the rest of the public were making huge personal, emotional and financial sacrifices to halt the spread of Covid 19.
    26 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Nicola Browne
  • Safe Access to Bull Island
    This amenity is very important and has been enjoyed by thousands of people during COVID-19 restriction as a safe place for recreation to walk and cycle with plenty of space for physical distancing. With the lifting of car restrictions onto the Causeway and the Wooden bridge of 18th May it will no longer be possible for the majority of people of all ages to continue to enjoy this amenity safely. Bull Island is an important protected biosphere and it should be kept free from air pollution. It is the stated aim of Dublin City Council to encourage cycling and walking.
    1,294 of 2,000 Signatures
    Created by Donna Cooney Picture
  • Make Wooden Bridge & Causeway to Bullwall car free once more
    The health & well being of Dubliners depends on it.
    324 of 400 Signatures
    Created by Austin Keegan Picture
  • Stop the development of a dangerous asphalt plant in Burnfoot, Co. Donegal
    Plans have been submitted to Donegal County Council in February 2020 for an asphalt plant to be developed in Gortnaskea, Burnfoot, Co.Donegal. The development will take place behind a large quarry at the foot of the Scalp Mountain. Asphalt plants mix sand and gravel with crude oil derivatives to make asphalt to pave roads, carparks etc. They have a huge impact from both an environment and a public health perspective. They release harmful chemicals into the air during production including arsenic, benzene, formaldehyde and cadmium. Exposure to these toxins can cause cancer, central nervous system issues, respiratory problems and skin irritations. Animal studies have shown that Polycylic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH's) effect reproduction, cause birth defects, and cause damage the the immune system. We want Donegal County Council to take notice of these grave concerns and to refuse planning permission for this development. Please sign to support and protect our communities environment and health, and to show that public health is more important that private wealth! If you have any further queries in relation to this issue, please contact conaloboyle2016@gmail.com
    718 of 800 Signatures
    Created by Conal O'Boyle Picture
  • Full Abortion Care in Northern Ireland
    The Department of Health NI are refusing to commission abortion services, despite regulations now in place which make abortion provision a legal requirement. This means that only limited abortion access has been provided and too many women and pregnant people have been refused treatment and told to travel. The Minister for Health has also stated this limited access is an ‘interim’ measure only, which means that there has been NO attempt by the Department to commission fitting, adequate and permanent abortion provision we need. We have the law. Now we need the access.
    562 of 600 Signatures
    Created by Nicola Browne
  • Say No To Mow in Co. Cork
    During this pandemic, many of our green areas have been allowed to grow wild, with no council mowing ongoing. Which is great! Green areas have been allowed to flourish with flowers growing through them. Widespread population declines of bees and other pollinators from habitat loss are a growing concern. However, spontaneous flowers like dandelions and clover can provide pollen and nectar sources throughout the growing season....... Therefore, please don't mow, don't spray, let them grow!
    748 of 800 Signatures
    Created by Alice Glendinning Picture
  • Shut down Moy Park for Covid19 Testing
    Yesterday it was reported that a female worker from East Timor, Luciana Viviana da Silva (58), who worked at Moy Park’s Dungannon site, died from coronavirus. Covid19 clusters are rising in workplaces in the meat and poultry industries, which have been recognised to be particularly high risk for workers. Action must be taken now to ensure the scale of outbreaks in meat industry in the USA and Brazil are not repeated in Northern Ireland.
    24 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Nicola Browne
  • Move Asylum Seekers out of Direct Provision centres
    People including small children are living in overcrowded rooms, with no privacy or space for self-isolation. The spread of Covid19 is very high in congregated settings and the treatment of people seeking asylum is inhumane. This is a public health and human rights issue and urgent action is needed. People seeking asylum need to be in self-contained accommodation where families can live together and people do not have to share with non-family members.
    1,257 of 2,000 Signatures
    Created by Bulelani Mfaco Picture
  • Reallocate Road Space to Walking and Cycling in Wexford
    These recent weeks of the COVID-19 period have shown us what life could be like. Cars no longer dominate our streets and roads. Children and adults alike are cycling and walking - without fearing for their personal safety. Young boys and girls are venturing onto roads where they have never cycled before. This will not continue unless something changes. Streets are for people. Properly designed segregated cycle ways, and adequate footpaths all will allow space for social distancing. But one day COVID-19 will be gone. The cars will remain - we must make space for people. We want Wexford County Council to revisit their 2013 draft Cycling Network Plan, and we want Wexford County Council to reallocate road space to walking and cycling in Wexford. Research published by Sports Ireland on the 30th April 2020 shows an additional 500,000 regular walkers, 450,000 runners and 220,000 cyclists. These numbers show a huge increase in people using public space to move around and exercise. See links to WexBUG for more info
    538 of 600 Signatures
    Created by Cormac Macgearailt
  • No Going Back - We Want an All Ireland National Health Service!
    Covid 19 made abundantly clear that our existing health services needed radical transformation to cope with the pandemic. Insufficient hospital bed capacity, too few intensive care beds, too few hospital nurses and staff, glaring structural defects accumulated over decades, as well as two separate health services on an island of 6.6 million inhabitants, were shown up as markedly inadequate. The lack of PPE and other public health resources for testing, contact tracing and protecting older people in nursing homes or health and social care workers arose from the absence of a coordinated, efficient national health service. The situation required the enactment of measures which would have been unthinkable pre-Covid 19. The budget of the Health Service Executive was expanded by €1 billion and the recruitment embargo on nurses and other key staff lifted. North and South, agreements were secured with private hospitals that they would temporarily operate as public hospitals, open to both Covid 19 and non-Covid 19 patients. In the South, patients with Covid-19 are being treated as public patients in what the caretaker Fine Gael government itself has lauded as a single national hospital service with no private-public distinction. If the extension of public healthcare can happen in a pandemic, why not also in ‘normal’ health crisis times? Why can it not be used to address the waiting lists of at least 700,000 in the South, 300,000 in the North? To address the totally inadequate step- down facilities or the lack of home care support? Or to enable everyone to have free access to GPs? The measures taken have shown that a comprehensive public health service is both possible and indispensable for providing healthcare to all when they need it. However, the Dublin government’s deal with the private hospitals, while a welcome step of making private hospitals public, is also costing the public purse €115 million a month. This continues the policy of shoring up the private sector with public money, a policy which has been shown in the North to undermine the ability of the NHS to provide timely cradle to grave treatment, free at the point of use.
    296 of 300 Signatures
    Created by Conor Reddy