• We demand our Right2Water Referendum.
    We want the people's voice to be heard respecting water and sanitation services in Ireland, and a referendum be held. Across the globe ordinary people have undergone tremendous hardship and suffering when water services are privatised. Water is a human right and must never be under the control of 'for profit' companies. Publicly owned, funded and managed water and sanitation services, free at the point of use, is the only way to guarantee access for all.
    774 of 800 Signatures
    Created by Noreen Murphy
  • Fixed charged fines for parking illegally in all disabled parking spaces.
    While the current €80 fixed charge fine ensures that some people don’t misuse disabled parking spaces, it’s clearly not enough of a deterrent. We need to root out this practice which causes real inconvenience for people who actually rely on disabled parking spots.
    128 of 200 Signatures
    Created by Ken Campbell Picture
  • "'Shame'rock for Trump - Not in our name"
    An Taoiseach is our representative abroad. When he accepts prejudice, racism and bigotry, it shames the people of our country. We feel that such an alliance is not good for our country's reputation and undermines our relationship with other countries. Trump is a despicable human being. A point must be reached where falling at the foot of a powerful man, at the expense of our values and morals and international reputation is not acceptable! "'Shame'rock for Trump: Not in our Name"
    12 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Concerned Citizen
  • Our Roadmap for Social Inclusion: Walking as One for an Inclusive Society
    The year 2017 marked twenty years since Ireland’s first comprehensive plan to address poverty: the National Anti-Poverty Strategy 1997-2006. The year 2018 marked key anniversary for End Poverty activists and for the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights! The 30th anniversary of the death of Joseph Wresinski, the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Martin Luther King, the centenary of the birth of Nelson Mandela (who launched the Make Poverty History Campaign) and the 70 years of the proclamation of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The year 2019 is starting with the Centenary of the first meeting of Dáil Éireann which occurred on 21 January 1919 in the Round Room of the Dublin Mansion House. In this first and highly symbolic meeting, the proceedings of the Dáil were conducted for the only time entirely in the Irish language, except for previously drafted declarations including the proclamation of the "Democratic Programme" including the following pledge: "It shall be the first duty of the Government of the Republic to make provision for the physical, mental and spiritual well-being of the children, to secure that no child shall suffer hunger or cold from lack of food, clothing, or shelter, but that all shall be provided with the means and facilities requisite for their proper education and training as Citizens of a Free and Gaelic Ireland." On the day of the Centenary, the Irish Times in partnership with the Children Rights' Alliance launched the #NoChild2020 campaign! No Child 2020 is an initiative by Fintan O'Toole and other Irish Times' journalists aiming to provide a sustained focus on child welfare and children’s issues over the coming year. We believe that Ireland needs a new Integrated Framework for Social Inclusion, to tackle inequality and poverty. We know Ireland faces major challenges: - to end the Housing Crisis - to deliver the SlainteCare’s vision for a better and fairer health system - to tackle Child Poverty and the poverty faced by the children's families - to implement the 17 Global Goals set down in the UN 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development including action to limit climate change with a strong concern for climate justice - to become a society with communities ready to leave no one behind, the promise of the UN 2030 Agenda If we are serious about tackling these issues, and serious about lifting people out of poverty and eliminating its causes, we must have a consistent, comprehensive plan to address poverty and social exclusion. Such a plan will only succeed if it is owned by civil society at large and also by the people experiencing poverty, not just politicians and the organisations that work to combat inequality and exclusion. Our call to action: let's walk as one to end poverty! In the follow-up of the 70th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (10 December 2018), as Ireland marks the Centenary of the Democratic Programme, strengthened by the launch of the "No Child 2020" initiative, inspired by the "End Poverty" legacies of Martin Luther King and Nelson Mandela, inspired also by the pledge of Joseph Wresinski: "To come together is our solemn duty," and following the call by Mary Robinson and the Elders to "Walk Together", we seek a new approach. Let's bring everyone who wants to make a difference together! All stakeholders: public bodies, teachers, trainers and researchers, corporates and services, youth groups and pensioners, and the people who fight against the poverty and stigma that they experience. Let's say: "We – citizens, workers, leaders, managers, carers, parents, activists or professionals or both – are ready to be part of the End Poverty plan. We all need to own this plan: to know the goals and own them. Together we wish to take part in a strong participatory process to make the next Anti-Poverty Plan the best ever. Those who live with poverty and social exclusion deserve it. They also should have the opportunity help develop this new plan. And when the plan is in place they should be able to play their part to ensure it is implemented. I have a role to play and I support this call to action and would like to be involve in the design, implementation and monitoring of our common plan!” Let us leave no one behind! All together in dignity!"
    41 of 100 Signatures
    Created by All Together in Dignity Ireland Picture
  • Social Hubs instead of rural post offices
    We seem to be allowing a continuous stripping of services from rural Ireland, this would be a start of a serious opportunity to reverse this trend and offer a genuine service to elderly people who want to remain in their homes. We could customise these hubs to suit each village or location, eg combine this service with the local community centre, a cafe a local business or a stand alone unit. This hub could be staffed by locals and would offer all the services of a post office, plus access for the elderly to a government services help desk, environmental help, grants, tourist info etc, it could also be a start of decentralisation from Dublin.
    6 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Sean Collins
  • Gain Irish exemption for 14 year old daughter with Dyslexia
    It is important because 1. Irish being a compulsory subject in this country is of little importance to my daughter who struggles with reading and writing in English because of her dyslexia. 2. Because of an outdated educational psychology system in Ireland my daughter can drop 2 other subjects to give her time for learning support.
    7 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Helen Murphy
  • Provide Pain Relief Patches with Medical Card
    To ensure pain relief is accessible to those on a low income and to keep the usage of tablets to a minimum. United we can help my healthcare accessible to all.
    390 of 400 Signatures
    Created by Noreen Doherty
  • Ratify the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities
    We have to end the inconceivable injustices and degrading treatment of disabled people here in Ireland. Too many disabled children and adults are living in forced institutions, separated from our families and communities, with no control over our lives, bodily integrity, often afraid, abused and unheard. Ireland is the last country in the European Union to ratify the convention. Ratifying the Convention will mean formal recognition of our rights and enable independent living and freedom from discrimination. 11 years after the UN adopted the Convention, Ireland is the only county in the EU that has failed to ratify it. We are asking all of you, to help us to shine a spotlight on our government’s inaction. It is NOT okay that disabled people have no control over our lives. We, disabled people, need your support and cannot do it alone. We need everyone to please support the legal protection of Disabled people's rights. By signing this important petition to ratify the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Disabled People, your support will help to positively change our country and the lives of many for the better. Thank you very much!
    8,482 of 9,000 Signatures
    Created by Ann Marie Flanagan
  • Stop Nursing Homes Charging Extra Fees
    Nursing homes need to be up front with an 'additional charges'. Many elderly people are too infirm to participate in 'additional extra’s and services! whatever they turn out to be. A reported example is of some being charged €20 for Mass is disgraceful. All private nursing homes should publish their list of what they are charging for over and above the fee for care. The list of ‘services’ should have the cost next to each item listed as well.
    45 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Mairin Higgins
  • Appoint a qualified consultant for Ehlers-Danlos syndrome in Ireland
    Ehlers-Danlos is a complex genetic condition resulting in faulty collagen. Because of this fault, patients' joints can dislocate on a daily basis, leaving us in agony. And that is only the beginning of the catalogue of symptoms that inflict us; some, life threatening. Early diagnosis and intervention is fundamental for long term prognosis and care, but unfortunately Ireland does not have one, qualified, appointed specialist in the whole country in the public health domain. This has lead to people with EDS/ HSD becoming so de-conditioned, with years of no medical intervention, that they cannot work, function and sometimes cannot walk. I was only diagnosed in my early 30's, after a life in pain -at times, extreme agony. I saw numerous specialists in various areas, spent my 20's on waiting lists. Some doctors and physiotherapists said they believed I had EDS, yet said they were not qualified to diagnose the condition. By the time of my diagnoses I had deteriorated so much that I found it very difficult to find even a physiotherapist or occupational therapist to keep me on as a patient. I am slowly clawing back parts of my life, but must pay out of my own pocket for treatment in the UK. We get no where on the treatment abroad scheme (especially in cases to see consultants) and as the main UK clinic is private this is automatically excluded from the scheme. The HSE pretend we do not exist, quoting ridiculous numbers when asked how many of us there are in the country. My story isn't special, or unique -it's a very similar story for most patients in Ireland. This cannot continue. People are literally being left to rot. We cannot let another generation of EDS and HSD patients go undiagnosed and untreated. Please support our campaign -Sign the petition and share on social media. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. ♡ www.eds4ire.ie ♡ https://www.facebook.com/eds4ire ♡ https://twitter.com/Eds4Ire ♡ https://www.instagram.com/eds4ire ♡ https://www.youtube.com/kittycolberteds4ire
    6,780 of 7,000 Signatures
    Created by Catherine Colbert Picture
  • Prevent The Mistreatment of People in Detention
    The Optional Protocol to the Convention against Torture (OPCAT) is an international human rights treaty designed to prevent torture and cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment in all places of detention. It introduces a combined system of national (NPM) and international (SPT) monitoring of all places of detention. Ireland signed the OPCAT in October 2007, but has yet to ratify it. The OPCAT recognises the central importance of inspection as a way of preventing human rights violations. These inspections create transparency and accountability, which in turn act as a deterrent against future cruel treatment. Places of detention are not limited to prisons. The OPCAT applies to anywhere where people are deprived of their liberty. The ratification of OPCAT would positively impact the lives of many people in vulnerable positions. Examples of places of detention could include, but are not limited to: • Psychiatric units • Children detention schools • Nursing homes • Social care units • Special Care Units • Immigration detention centres • Direct provision • Pre-trial detention facilities • Garda stations OPCAT applies to anywhere people are deprived of their liberty. Pushing for the ratification of OPCAT might one day benefit a friend, neighbour, family member, or maybe even yourself. For Ireland to meet its international obligations, we must put in place sufficient and effective safeguards to ensure that vulnerable individuals are not victimised. The Convention recognizes that it is in closed spaces where the most serious violations of human rights can take place. Ireland has a troubling history of failing to protect those we have placed in closed spaces. The historical abuse of those in child institutions and other historical places of detention has shown the need for ongoing inspection. By failing to ratify OPCAT, Ireland perpetuates a situation that increases the vulnerability of all persons currently in detention. It is essential that Ireland moves towards the creation of an NPM which can ensure that no place of detention – prison, Garda station, hospital or care home – is beyond the reach of comprehensive and rigorous inspection. _________ To learn more about OPCAT: http://www.apt.ch/en/what-is-the-opcat/ To learn more about NPMs: http://www.apt.ch/en/national-preventive-mechanisms-npms/ To learn more about the SPT: http://www.ohchr.org/EN/HRBodies/OPCAT/Pages/OPCATIntro.aspx To see which countries have ratified OPCAT: http://www.apt.ch/en/opcat-database/
    44 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Irish Penal Reform Trust (IPRT)
  • Disability Rights for Ireland Right Now
    Ireland signed the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD) in 2007. Ireland has yet to ratify the Convention 10 years later and is shamefully the only EU state not to have done so. Fianna Fail, the PD's,The Green Party, Fine Gael, The Labour Party and Independents including Finian McGrath Minister of State with Responsibilities for Disability have shared power during this period. While the convention contains no new rights,what it does is bring together in one document, all existing rights in other conventions and international human rights and treaties, that give equal status to persons with disabilities. If the UNCRPD were ratified what would this mean? For example cuts to services that would prohibit a person with a disability playing an equal role as a citizen of the Republic of Ireland and in their community would be in breech of an international convention. Many cuts to Disability Services occurred during the economic downturn from 2007. There are around 600,000 people with disabilities currently living in the Republic of Ireland. They deserve equal status . Please sign our petition and share with your friends. Disability Rights for Ireland Right Now. South Tipperary Disability Groups Forum
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    Created by anthony lyons