• Improve public transport for people with a disability.
    This is an important issue for all to remove inequality for those with a disability when accessing public transport. Unequal access to transport limits a person greatly as transport can unlock a range of opportunities for an individual with it allowing ease of access to necessities in life such as education and employment. Irish Rail is failing to provide adequate accessible transport for all, with people with a disability facing many barriers when using train services. These include: • 4 hour notice required to Irish Rail for those who need assistance getting on and off a train; • Reliance on staff being present for use of a manual ramp to allow a passenger who needs assistance to get on and off the train; • Lifts being left broken in train stations for long periods of time; • Visual and sound aids on board not working. Other issues which were highlighted from respondents in a study mentioned in 'Transport Access For All 2012' include: • More space for wheelchair users and better toilets on board; • Automatic ramps so wheelchair users could board independently; • A pass in place of tickets for disabled people because it can be difficult standing in queues. • Signposting of wheelchair accessible routes. Improvements need to be made to allow ease of access for people with a disability. We need to lobby and have support from the public in order for these improvements to come into action. The needs of the disabled should not be over looked when considering transport and they need to be met by the Minister of Transport, Irish Rail and relating bodies. Inaccessible transport for those with a disability widens the gap of inequality in our Irish society. The current infrastructure in place for Irish Rail does not match up to the modern technology available in our world today. 4 hours notice and unreliable lifts need to be a thing of past. Improvements need to happen and need to happen now.
    238 of 300 Signatures
    Created by Gillian Keegan
  • Stronger legislation to prevent discrimination against mental health in workplaces
    Its important because anxiety and depression can affect one in 6 people. As one of them I want to be able to contribute positively to society. I want to be able to be able to work. I want to be able to work with an organisation where having anxiety does not mean I live in fear of loosing my job if my employer finds out. Or be discriminated from promotions or progressing in an organisation if they know I have anxiety. I want to fulfil my potential and be treated with dignity not with misunderstanding or stigma.
    17 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Cat Mc
  • Make Irish politicians use the public health services only. No private care.
    Our health service is in crisis. I heard a lady on the radio say "you would never believe the conditions unless you see it". I firmly believe that to be true. Our health service will never improve until Irish politicians (and preferably their families) have to rely solely on the public health system. Do we not have the right to prompt and effective healthcare. It shouldn't become a matter of your ability to pay. It might stop them trying to fix the public health services by pumping unending money into private hospitals. Please sign and share.
    16 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Cliodhna Crowley
  • Demand full rights for people with disabilities in Ireland - add your voice
    After an 11-year delay, the Government recently took the final steps towards ratifying the United Nations Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities. However, it turns out that the government has for now abandoned its pledge to at the same time ratify a key protocol that goes along with the Convention. The protocol gives people with disabilities a real chance to achieve their rights in cases where the government is failing them. The protocol allows groups or individuals to make complaints to the UN to ensure the government does what it says it will do. This government has effectively turned its back on 640,000 people with disabilities in this State by failing to ratify this protocol.
    2,891 of 3,000 Signatures
    Created by Róisín Shortall Picture
  • We demand our Right2Water Referendum.
    We want the people's voice to be heard respecting water and sanitation services in Ireland, and a referendum be held. Across the globe ordinary people have undergone tremendous hardship and suffering when water services are privatised. Water is a human right and must never be under the control of 'for profit' companies. Publicly owned, funded and managed water and sanitation services, free at the point of use, is the only way to guarantee access for all.
    774 of 800 Signatures
    Created by Noreen Murphy
  • Fixed charged fines for parking illegally in all disabled parking spaces.
    While the current €80 fixed charge fine ensures that some people don’t misuse disabled parking spaces, it’s clearly not enough of a deterrent. We need to root out this practice which causes real inconvenience for people who actually rely on disabled parking spots.
    129 of 200 Signatures
    Created by Ken Campbell Picture
  • "'Shame'rock for Trump - Not in our name"
    An Taoiseach is our representative abroad. When he accepts prejudice, racism and bigotry, it shames the people of our country. We feel that such an alliance is not good for our country's reputation and undermines our relationship with other countries. Trump is a despicable human being. A point must be reached where falling at the foot of a powerful man, at the expense of our values and morals and international reputation is not acceptable! "'Shame'rock for Trump: Not in our Name"
    13 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Concerned Citizen
  • Our Roadmap for Social Inclusion: Walking as One for an Inclusive Society
    The year 2017 marked twenty years since Ireland’s first comprehensive plan to address poverty: the National Anti-Poverty Strategy 1997-2006. The year 2018 marked key anniversary for End Poverty activists and for the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights! The 30th anniversary of the death of Joseph Wresinski, the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Martin Luther King, the centenary of the birth of Nelson Mandela (who launched the Make Poverty History Campaign) and the 70 years of the proclamation of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The year 2019 is starting with the Centenary of the first meeting of Dáil Éireann which occurred on 21 January 1919 in the Round Room of the Dublin Mansion House. In this first and highly symbolic meeting, the proceedings of the Dáil were conducted for the only time entirely in the Irish language, except for previously drafted declarations including the proclamation of the "Democratic Programme" including the following pledge: "It shall be the first duty of the Government of the Republic to make provision for the physical, mental and spiritual well-being of the children, to secure that no child shall suffer hunger or cold from lack of food, clothing, or shelter, but that all shall be provided with the means and facilities requisite for their proper education and training as Citizens of a Free and Gaelic Ireland." On the day of the Centenary, the Irish Times in partnership with the Children Rights' Alliance launched the #NoChild2020 campaign! No Child 2020 is an initiative by Fintan O'Toole and other Irish Times' journalists aiming to provide a sustained focus on child welfare and children’s issues over the coming year. We believe that Ireland needs a new Integrated Framework for Social Inclusion, to tackle inequality and poverty. We know Ireland faces major challenges: - to end the Housing Crisis - to deliver the SlainteCare’s vision for a better and fairer health system - to tackle Child Poverty and the poverty faced by the children's families - to implement the 17 Global Goals set down in the UN 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development including action to limit climate change with a strong concern for climate justice - to become a society with communities ready to leave no one behind, the promise of the UN 2030 Agenda If we are serious about tackling these issues, and serious about lifting people out of poverty and eliminating its causes, we must have a consistent, comprehensive plan to address poverty and social exclusion. Such a plan will only succeed if it is owned by civil society at large and also by the people experiencing poverty, not just politicians and the organisations that work to combat inequality and exclusion. Our call to action: let's walk as one to end poverty! In the follow-up of the 70th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (10 December 2018), as Ireland marks the Centenary of the Democratic Programme, strengthened by the launch of the "No Child 2020" initiative, inspired by the "End Poverty" legacies of Martin Luther King and Nelson Mandela, inspired also by the pledge of Joseph Wresinski: "To come together is our solemn duty," and following the call by Mary Robinson and the Elders to "Walk Together", we seek a new approach. Let's bring everyone who wants to make a difference together! All stakeholders: public bodies, teachers, trainers and researchers, corporates and services, youth groups and pensioners, and the people who fight against the poverty and stigma that they experience. Let's say: "We – citizens, workers, leaders, managers, carers, parents, activists or professionals or both – are ready to be part of the End Poverty plan. We all need to own this plan: to know the goals and own them. Together we wish to take part in a strong participatory process to make the next Anti-Poverty Plan the best ever. Those who live with poverty and social exclusion deserve it. They also should have the opportunity help develop this new plan. And when the plan is in place they should be able to play their part to ensure it is implemented. I have a role to play and I support this call to action and would like to be involve in the design, implementation and monitoring of our common plan!” Let us leave no one behind! All together in dignity!"
    42 of 100 Signatures
    Created by All Together in Dignity Ireland Picture
  • Social Hubs instead of rural post offices
    We seem to be allowing a continuous stripping of services from rural Ireland, this would be a start of a serious opportunity to reverse this trend and offer a genuine service to elderly people who want to remain in their homes. We could customise these hubs to suit each village or location, eg combine this service with the local community centre, a cafe a local business or a stand alone unit. This hub could be staffed by locals and would offer all the services of a post office, plus access for the elderly to a government services help desk, environmental help, grants, tourist info etc, it could also be a start of decentralisation from Dublin.
    7 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Sean Collins
  • Gain Irish exemption for 14 year old daughter with Dyslexia
    It is important because 1. Irish being a compulsory subject in this country is of little importance to my daughter who struggles with reading and writing in English because of her dyslexia. 2. Because of an outdated educational psychology system in Ireland my daughter can drop 2 other subjects to give her time for learning support.
    7 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Helen Murphy
  • Provide Pain Relief Patches with Medical Card
    To ensure pain relief is accessible to those on a low income and to keep the usage of tablets to a minimum. United we can help my healthcare accessible to all.
    391 of 400 Signatures
    Created by Noreen Doherty
  • Ratify the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities
    We have to end the inconceivable injustices and degrading treatment of disabled people here in Ireland. Too many disabled children and adults are living in forced institutions, separated from our families and communities, with no control over our lives, bodily integrity, often afraid, abused and unheard. Ireland is the last country in the European Union to ratify the convention. Ratifying the Convention will mean formal recognition of our rights and enable independent living and freedom from discrimination. 11 years after the UN adopted the Convention, Ireland is the only county in the EU that has failed to ratify it. We are asking all of you, to help us to shine a spotlight on our government’s inaction. It is NOT okay that disabled people have no control over our lives. We, disabled people, need your support and cannot do it alone. We need everyone to please support the legal protection of Disabled people's rights. By signing this important petition to ratify the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Disabled People, your support will help to positively change our country and the lives of many for the better. Thank you very much!
    8,482 of 9,000 Signatures
    Created by Ann Marie Flanagan