• Support your local Retained Firefighters
    There are currently around 3,000 firefighters nationwide. Some two-thirds of this number — over 2,000 — are employed as retained rather than full-time firefighters. Retained fire service staff are paid an annual retainer to be available for call-outs, but their pay depends on the number of incidents they attend. They are allowed to work part-time jobs to supplement their income, but do so knowing that their second job must be within 2.5km of their fire station. Retained firefighters must also live within that same distance from the fire station they are attached to in order to respond “within five minutes” of being paged to report to work. “Retained firefighters are on call 24/7. They can never have a drink, can never stray too far from home, because unlike full-time firefighters, they don’t work shifts,” “They have to be available constantly. Remember the Covid 2km restriction rule in 2020 when every person in Ireland couldn’t travel outside of that radius? Welcome to the world of a retained firefighter. You are a prisoner in your own town. “Employers are understandably reluctant to hire retained firefighters on a part-time basis because we are firefighters first and foremost and we have to down tools when needed. “Previously, firefighters have been very, very reluctant to go on strike, but this time we are willing to do so. Every person who is a firefighter wants to be a firefighter. There is no difference between a full-time firefighter and a retained firefighter. The training is exactly the same. It costs €50,000 to train a firefighter and we are losing over 100 retained firefighters each year. “With or without a strike, the fire service is in compete crisis. Even if the strike does not go ahead as proposed, around 60pc of firefighters plan to quit the service within the next 18 months.” One of the main reason members were quitting “in their droves” was because it is practically impossible for retained firefighters to obtain mortgage approval because of their employment status. Another “major problem” was their lack of pension entitlements compared with full-timers. “Firefighters are always there to help any and every member in society in their darkest hour. Now every firefighter is calling for help but no one is listening. Retained firefighters feel so let down by government agencies." “All firefighters want is to be firefighters. No one wants to leave the fire service, they want to serve their communities with dignity, passion and professionalism, as they have done for decades. But their commitment is no longer sustainable unless there is a full reform of how the fire service is delivered in Ireland.”
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    Created by National Retained Firefighters of Ireland
  • Save Hedgerow Trees
    If we don't speak out, nothing will change. The Earth is now on a trajectory towards total ecosystem collapse. How far along that trajectory it goes depends on us, on the actions we take. Ireland is failing miserably at cutting it's carbon emissions and protecting its environment. It beggars belief that that the native tree stocks in our hedgerows are not currently being safeguarded, and are allowed to be decimated at a such a rate. It's time to take a stand, join me.
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    Created by Niamh Concannon
  • Don't shop, adopt
    More than 30 dogs are abandoned every day in Ireland. These animals don't have a place to call home or an owner to cuddle with. Think twice before paying hundreds for a new puppy. There are a lot of animals in cages, sad and unloved, who are willing to find a new home.
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    Created by Noelle Carrizo Picture
  • Stop Melanoma Cancer - Ban Sunbeds Ireland
    My name is Laura Warren. I am from Kilkenny, Ireland. I am a health and nutrition influencer in Ireland predominantly based on Instagram: Elite Living Nutrition. I was recently diagnosed with Melanoma Cancer stage 1b. In my younger years I would have used sunbeds more than 5 times a year, which was 5 times too many! Back then we were encouraged to use sunbeds to give our Irish skin a base before we went on holidays. I also suffered from acne when I was younger and I was encouraged at the time by Beauty Therapists to use sunbeds to help clear up my acne. When I was younger I also wore sun factors that weren't strong enough to protect my delicate skin. Back in the day, when I was going to school, they never educated us on the dangers of the sun and there was certainly never any mentions of sun-beds. The secondary school I went to was a convent run by nuns at the time. My Melanoma Cancer had to be excisioned out of my body through 2 surgeries where my surgeon had to excision 2mm of my skin for biopsy. It has been an extremely traumatic time for me and my family. Thankfully the results of the second surgery came back benign. I am one of the lucky ones and now I have to get regular skin-checks for 5 years with no certainty that it won't come back elsewhere in my body. It's time for change. Rates of this cancer are growing faster than any other type of cancer. It's time for our Government to take the dangers of sunbeds "seriously" Let's act now to save lives - I could have been told I had six weeks to live - think about that for a moment. I am grateful for my second chance at life. To help to make change in this world we live in, I am going to lobby for the rest of life to try to get sunbeds banned in Ireland. But, I need all your help to sign this petition, I cannot do this alone! Every family in Ireland and across the world has been affected by cancer in some shape or form and it ain't pretty. It's time for change in this country, let's help to make the future of this country a healthier place to live in. Melanoma is the most dangerous form of skin cancer because of its ability to spread to other organs more rapidly if it is not caught early. Most skin cancers are preventable by reducing exposure to ultraviolet radiation from the natural sunlight and indoor tanning devices — sunbeds/tanning beds. Australia and Brazil banned them many years ago, why has our Government not banned them yet? We want answers. What is the delay in banning sunbeds in Ireland that are clearly linked to Melanoma Cancer? I am calling on you, the good people of Ireland to act now and help me by signing this petition. A sunbed ban in Ireland would prevent thousands of skin cancer deaths and save the HSE millions a year.
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    Created by Laura Warren
  • Ban Disposable Vapes Ireland
    Disposable Vapes are a product that have surged in popularity in recent years. These products are a threat to: 1. Public Health - With disposable vapes nicotine is delivered through an aerosol vapor which has been shown to have inflammatory effects on the respiratory system. As well, experts have warned of the potential of disposable vapes to act a gateway for smoking, especially for young people and adolescents. 2. The Environment - Disposable vapes are single-use items that contain plastic, electronics, and lithium-ion batteries. Disposable vapes are more frequently becoming a source of litter on our streets. This can result in harmful waste materials, such as mercury and cadmium, being leached into our environment, negatively impacting human health and biodiversity. These risks are simply not worth the convenience of a single use product! 3. Waste of Valuable Resources - The opportunity cost of global disposable vape production for the green economy is massive. The very materials such as lithium and copper are the precious materials needed for greener technology. It is estimated 90 tons of lithium and 1,600 tons of copper were used for the global production of disposable vapes in 2022. To put this into perspective, this amount of lithium is equivalent to the amount needed to produce 11,000 electric vehicles and is enough copper for 1.6 million electric vehicle charger units So let's put an end to the madness that is disposable vapes. Let's protect our health, our young people and our environment. Sign the Petition! Interested in reading more, check out the following source: https://www.independent.ie/irish-news/minister-defends-plan-to-ban-disposable-vapes-theyre-making-the-world-worse/42071990.html https://www.independent.ie/irish-news/politics/new-laws-to-ban-sale-of-vaping-products-to-under-18s/42141930.html https://web.archive.org/web/20220718111558id_/https://www.bmj.com/content/bmj/378/bmj-2021-065997.full.pdf https://www.ft.com/content/6d5ed980-8b91-4372-9e7e-14eda5419325
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    Created by Lyndsey O'Connell
  • 5 Years Since Repeal - Support the Pro-Choice Bill!
    May 25th is five years since the Repeal referendum when the people of Ireland voted overwhelmingly for choice, compassion and care - after an historic mass movement forced the government to finally let the people decide. Now, an official review has found many serious problems with the abortion law. Instead of acting quickly to fix them, the Government wants to delay, to drag things out and avoid taking decisions until after the next election. That’s why on May 25th this year, People before Profit is introducing a Pro-Choice Bill in the Dáil to fix the problems in the law and provide for real choice. The Health (Regulation of Termination of Pregnancy) (Amendment) Bill 2023 would: abolish the patronising and medically unnecessary 3 day wait to access abortion care fully decriminalise abortion to end the chilling effect for doctors - a draconian 14 year prison sentence still applies to medical professionals if they perform abortions outside the law. This is hindering access in cases of fatal foetal anomaly and for pregnant people suffering serious risks to their health or life. The number of abortions provided on life or health grounds is no larger than it was before repeal, forcing women in medically dangerous situations to travel. reform the fatal foetal anomalies law to ensure care is available here for all those who need it. Currently, half of parents in this tragic situation are still forced to travel to access abortion care. abolish the rigid 12 week limit and allow abortion on request until viability to provide real choice. The 12 week limit makes no allowance for women and girls pushed over the limit by failed procedures or inability to access medical appointments. It fails those with irregular periods who didn’t realise they were pregnant in time; women whose situations change, for instance being subjected to domestic violence, which often begins during pregnancy when they are at their most vulnerable; and many others in the myriad other difficult situations that pregnant people can face. We need your support to pressure politicians to vote for the Bill so that it becomes law.
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    Created by Diana O'Dwyer
  • Call for DCC to take part in #NoMowMay
    We're calling for Dublin City Council to take part in #NoMowMay and cease mowing the grass of parks and green spaces during the month of May to support wildlife. Why DCC should take part in #NoMowMay: - Pollinators, like bees and butterflies, are the backbone of a healthy ecosystem. They rely on early flowering plants such as daisies, dandelions, and other wildflowers as a valuable source of nectar. - The longer grass provides welcome cover for foraging wildlife such as birds and hedgehogs, as well as a wide variety of insects to snack on. - A healthy lawn with long grass and wildflowers can help in the fight against climate change by absorbing pollution and locking carbon away in the soil. Dublin City Council has signed up for the All-Ireland Polinator Plan which recommends reducing mowing to 5 times a year (Once in mid April and then not again until end of May) but this clearly is not being observed. The All-Ireland Pollinator Plan notes reducing mowing as the most cost effective and impactful way to provide food for pollinators and other insects. Visible improvements have been made by DCC in parks around the city to encourage biodiversity and this is welcomed and appreciated! All we ask is that DCC ease up on mowing wherever possible to give our vital pollinators the best chance at survival. Further reading: Why bees matter? Bees are the most important pollinator of crops and native plant species in Ireland. They are a key component of our wildlife and one of the busiest, least appreciated work forces we have. A study from the Department of the Environment found that bees are worth €53m a year to the economy. In Ireland crops such as apples, strawberries, raspberries, tomatoes, blackcurrants, peppers, courgettes and pumpkins are reliant on bees for pollination. It is estimated that almost three quarters of our wild plants rely on insect pollinators, of which bees are most important. But bees are declining at a record level in Ireland. Due to habitat loss and the use of pesticides more than half of Ireland’s bee species have undergone substantial declines since 1980. The distribution of 42 species has declined by more than 50%. (Source: pollinators.ie) All-Ireland Polinator Plan: https://pollinators.ie/no-mow-may/ All-Ireland Polinator Plan for councils: https://pollinators.ie/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/Councils_actions-to-help-pollinators-2018-WEB.pdf
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    Created by Hannah Little
  • Clongriffin Dart Access
    Encourage & facilitate use of public transport. Currently women, girls, people in wheelchairs, with bikes & buggies are either afraid or cannot access station.
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    Created by Joan Hopkins
  • Get SUVs off our roads
    SUVs are 20% more polluting regular cars. They are bigger, more dangerous and take up more room in parking spaces and on the street. Even SUVs that are fully electric are emissions-intensive, because of their battery size and the amount of energy they require. SUV and crossover sales are growing rapidly in Ireland: 55,000 were sold in 2021 (nearly 55% of all new cars). Many people do not actually need an SUV for their daily usage. SUVs popularity is driven more by fashion and marketing than practical considerations. Most SUVs are not designed for off-road use, and their larger size and weight can make them less efficient and more difficult to manoeuvre in urban areas.
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  • Get SUVs off our roads
    SUVs are 20% more polluting regular cars. They are bigger, more dangerous and take up more room in parking spaces and on the street. Even SUVs that are fully electric are emissions-intensive, because of their battery size and the amount of energy they require. SUV and crossover sales are growing rapidly in Ireland: 55,000 were sold in 2021 (nearly 55% of all new cars). Many people do not actually need an SUV for their daily usage. SUVs popularity is driven more by fashion and marketing than practical considerations. Most SUVs are not designed for off-road use, and their larger size and weight can make them less efficient and more difficult to manoeuvre in urban areas.
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  • Stop Tesco Ireland Picking on Dot.Com Pickers and Drivers
    Hundreds of low-paid workers who run Tesco Ireland's online shopping operation have been told that their work schedules will change in May. This will result in these workers losing thousands of Euros in income and interfere with their ability to fulfil family caring roles.
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    Created by Mandate
  • Save the Douglas Road
    Widening the Douglas Road will destroy the local environment, heritage and character of this historic Cork road forever. There are much cheaper, faster and greener ways to improve public and active transport than this proposal. It will not only reduce the quality of life for many residents in the area, but also for those who use the Douglas Road. When there is more congestion around Douglas Village and on the side roads (as the plan doesn't help parents who bring children to school in the area), we will wonder why we let it happen. There will be no going back once the mature trees and walls of architectural heritage are torn down. Destroying the road is not the solution - there are alternatives. Road reallocation, school bus services etc. Please help us in our campaign to save the Douglas Road
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    Created by michele hill