• Install 12 Public Drinking Water Fountains in Cork City for the Homeless People of Cork & Beyond
    We all have a right to adequate access to drinking water. The UN has told the Irish state that according to international human rights law, all levels of government are under an obligation to provide urgent measures, including financial assistance, to ensure access to affordable housing, and essential levels of drinking water and sanitation services.
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    Created by Cork Integrative Health Community Picture
  • Save The Meadows, Merlin Park Galway
    Merlin Park meadows has been conserved as a public amenity space for many generations and is a vital green space for the people of Galway. With 84 acres of land already zoned for development within the Merlin Park hospital complex, it will have an adverse impact on the community - once it is gone, it can never be replaced. With the expansion of housing and commercial lands surrounding the area, it is a healthy environment for the ever increasing population who depend on it as an escape from polluted environments, a place for mental relaxation and physical activity. Along with the Merlin Park Woods it is the only known habitat in the city where Red Squirrel are thriving and sightings from other areas of the city are of roadkill. It is home to thousands of mammals and wildlife species such as butterflies, bumblebees and dragonflies providing a safe haven for them with huge declines in the number of these species and many threatened species in recent years. It is home to a variety of Orchids and wildflowers similar to the protected Burren in Co Clare. This is a very unique meadow within the city of Galway and is totally natural. Galway has been awarded the European Green Leaf Award for 2017, to allow development on public land and destroy this meadow would totally go against this.
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    Created by Car Stanley Picture
  • Save Our Park
    The people of this community have the lowest density of green space in the state. The council refuse to discuss their plans for the site and intend to sell the land to developers. They are threatening to close a Community Garden which is thriving by delaying the allocation of allotments to residents of the Community that have applied. The area is socially deprived and has .7 % of green space per resident when the World Health Organisation recommends 9% per resident pet community.
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    Created by Fergal Butler Picture
  • Old Bawn Beach, Wexford
    This is a popular beach but a lot of sharp branches are being washed on shore and are sticking out of the sand which is a hazard, especially for young kids.
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    Created by Colin Logue Picture
  • Ban Roundup Use By Kilkenny County Council
    Glyphosate the main ingredient in Roundup is poisonous to humans, wildlife and the environment. According to the WHO it is 'probably carcinogenic'. https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/widely-used-herbicide-linked-to-cancer/ It is being sprayed on roadsides, paths, in housing estates close to where people live. Ireland has the second highest levels of glyphosate in surface water in the EU. Page 83 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.2903/j.efsa.2015.4302/epdf
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    Created by Neil Maclean Picture
  • NO TO NATIONAL PAY BY WEIGHT CHARGES
    Its important because it will encourage dumping. The bin system is fine. Taxes are being put on ordinary people who are already doing their best to help with the rubbish by putting them into bins already as well as recycling their products. Its not right to impose such charges. We are being forced to pay a polluters charge how dare they. Its the shops have to reduce this packaging on products sold in their shops as we are paying for it now.
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    Created by Noreen Doherty Picture
  • Get Toilets in Mountjoy Prison
    There are people, human beings in Mountjoy Prison who while serving time need to do so with this minimum amount of dignity. Ireland has been chastised by the UN as far back as 1993 for this. When Ireland had more money than it knew what to do with, during the Celtic Tiger years it still didn't care enough to install toilets for these prisoners. Does anyone out there care about this? It's the modern day Magdeline Laundry or Industrial School scenario, of people bunged into a place where no one cares o considers them. It's a complete and total disgrace.
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    Created by Roberta Carey
  • Review & Revise the Broadcasting Authority of Ireland’s Code for Current Affairs Reporting
    The Code’s stated purpose is to achieve fairness, impartiality and objectivity. However when it comes to discussion on Ireland’s abortion laws, it is having the effect of censoring the voices of those who have been most impacted by Ireland’s restrictive regime . The BAI specifically took issue with the Graham and Helen Linehan advocating for legislative and constitutional change that would spare other women, girls and couples the trauma of being denied access to termination of pregnancy in cases of fatal foetal anomalies, and their support for Amnesty International’s campaign on this. This was despite the Ray D’Arcy Show seeking in advance and then reading out the views of two anti-choice organisations on both the Linehans’ story and Amnesty International’s campaign. Fairness, objectivity and impartiality were thus achieved. People must be allowed tell their true, factual personal stories without being silenced from naming and calling for the very changes that could vindicate their human rights and spare other women, girls and couples unnecessary trauma. It is in the public interest that broadcasters aren’t shackled by an interpretation of 'balance' which is so extreme as to be absurd. Red C/Amnesty International Ireland polling recently showed that only 14% of people trust the media as a source of information when deciding their stance on abortion. Those they trust most are health professionals and women who have had abortions. The same polling found that 52% of the Irish public feel they do not have enough information about the 8th Amendment, and think the media should give better information on it. Now that the government has promised that a Citizens’ Assembly will consider the 8th Amendment, there has never been a more critical time for the public to have information about its actual impacts on the lives of real women and their families. It is critical that the brave voices of those whose lives have been impacted by the 8th amendment can participate in the public conversation about this issue without the fear of having to be confronted in an adversarial manner about the choices that they made in the best interests of themselves and their families, and without feeling censored by the State, through the BAI, from calling for the legal changes necessary to prevent the suffering they endured being inflicted on others.
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    Created by Gaye Edwards
  • End Fluoridation in the water supply
    Because fluoride is a nasty chemical which should not be in the people's water supply The Republic of Ireland (not Northern Ireland) is now one of the last places in Europe that still poison the people's water supply and pay for the privilege. Europe Out of a population of about three-quarters of a billion, under 14 million people (approximately a mere 2%) in Europe receive artificially fluoridated water. Those people are in the UK (5,797,000), Republic of Ireland (3,250,000), Spain (4,250,000), and Serbia (300,000).[9] The first water fluoridation in Europe was in West Germany and Sweden in 1952, bringing fluoridated water to about 42,000 people. By mid-1962, about 1 million Europeans in 18 communities in 11 countries were receiving fluoridated water.[44] Many European countries have rejected water fluoridation in general. This including Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Northern Ireland, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland,[45] Scotland,[46] Iceland, and Italy. A 2003 survey of over 500 Europeans from 16 countries concluded that "the vast majority of people are opposed water fluoridation". IRELAND The majority of drinking water is fluoridated. Around 2012, 3.25 million people received artificially-fluoridated water.[9] 71% of the population in 2002 resided in fluoridated communities.[60] The fluoridation agent used is hydro fluorosilicic acid (HFSA; H2SiF6).[61] In a 2002 public survey, 45% of respondents expressed some concern about fluoridation.[62] In 1957, the Department of Health established a Fluorine Consultative Council which recommended fluoridation at 1.0 ppm of public water supplies, then accessed by ~50% of the population.[63] This was felt to be a much cheaper way of improving the quality of children's teeth than employing more dentists.[64] This led to the Health (Fluoridation of Water Supplies) Act 1960, which mandated compulsory fluoridation by local authorities.[64][65] The statutory instruments made in 1962–65 under the 1960 Act were separate for each local authority, setting the level of fluoride in drinking water to 0.8–1.0 ppm.[66][67] The current regulations date from 2007 and set the level to 0.6–0.8 ppm, with a target value of 0.7 ppm.[68] Implementation of fluoridation was held up by preliminary dental surveying and water testing,[69] and a court case, Ryan v. Attorney General.[70] In 1965, the Supreme Court rejected Gladys Ryan's claim that the Act violated the Constitution of Ireland's guarantee of the right to bodily integrity.[70][71] By 1965, Greater Dublin's water was fluoridated; by 1973, other urban centres were.[72] Studies from the late 1970s to mid-1990s showed a higher decrease in (and lower incidence of) dental decay in school children living in areas where water was fluoridated than in areas where water was not fluoridated.[73] A private member's bill to end fluoridation was defeated in the Dáil on 12 November 2013.[74][75] It was supported by Sinn Féin and some of the technical group and opposed by the Fine Gael-Labour government and Fianna Fáil.[75][76][77] Recently there is much local opposition to the national fluoridation mandate. Early in 2014, Cork County Council and Laois County Council passed motions for the cessation of water fluoridation. In Autumn 2014, Cork City Council, Dublin City Council,[58][59] and Kerry County Council passed similar motions. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fluoridation_by_country There is no evidence that it really improves or is good for your teeth but there is REAL evidence that it damages your brain and causes thyroid problems in women
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    Created by Emmett Brady
  • STOP the closure of hostels for the homeless, and provide suitable alternative accommodation.
    Johns Lane West and Brú Aimsir hostels give shelter to almost 150 people who are former rough sleepers in Dublin. They are both set to close in the coming weeks. This will result in the loss of 150 beds for those sleeping rough. Focus Ireland and Peter McVerry Trust who currently run the hostels have not revealed how they plan to accommodate these people who will be forced back onto the streets with the closure of these hostels. The residents have been told they must ring the freephone in Parkgate St to find alternative accommodation. With an already critical shortage of beds, this will only put added strain on a flawed system which puts people in direct competition with each other, having to spend all day trying to get through to the freephone phoneline, often to simply be told there are no beds available. The Irish Housing Network demands: Dublin City Council, Peter McVerry Trust and Focus Ireland put a transparent plan in place with the residents of the hostels in providing suitable accommodation for those affected by the hostels’ closure. Long term social housing stock is immediately turned over for homeless people and families through the building of housing and opening and refurbishment of empty homes. Tenant’s rights for those in emergency accommodation so they cannot be evicted without notice and are protected under tenancy legislation. Rights for Travellers and Roma people in the ability to practice their culture and have well maintained and provisioned sites available throughout the country, including the restoration of traditional roadside stopping places.
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    Created by Rosemary Fearsaor-Hughes Picture
  • Protect my Child from Cancer - Stop TTIP Now
    I can’t believe that Johnson & Johnson Talc based baby products and shower products I used on my new-born child, causes cancer! I am shocked at RTE’s recent report stating: “Johnson & Johnson faces claims that, in an effort to boost sales, it failed for decades to warn consumers that its talc-based products could cause cancer. About 1,000 cases have been filed in Missouri state court, and another 200 in New Jersey.” On 25th February 2016, RTE published a report stating: “A lawyer for the family of a woman whose death from ovarian cancer was linked to her use of Johnson & Johnson talc-based Baby Powder and Shower to Shower said: Company documents show using the products could cause the disease” Just a few weeks ago I read, “Johnson & Johnson was ordered by a Missouri state jury in the US to pay $72m (€65m) in damages to the family of Jacqueline Fox, who developed ovarian cancer after using the products for several decades.” Johnson & Johnson is an American multinational medical devices, pharmaceutical and consumer packaged goods manufacturer founded in 1886. Johnson & Johnson has been operating in Ireland since 1935. The Company is engaged in the supply of healthcare, personal care and toiletries and over the counter products to the consumer market. If TTIP is agreed it will allow big businesses to sue the Irish government in secret and limit democratic government’s power to introduce new health and safety regulations, protect food standards and so much more. I trusted Johnson & Johnson baby products and if I had known how damaging they were I would never have used them on my son. I don’t want Corporations like Johnson & Johnson covering up issues of great public health concern for the sake of their own profits. If this US & EU Trade deal is agreed what will happen to my health and the health of my child in the future? Photo credit: David Avocado Wolfe
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    Created by Jens HayDays Picture
  • PSI: Don't enact the proposed regulations for Pharmaceutical Assisants
    My mother has worked as a Pharmaceutical Assistant for 42 years. She works 29 hours per week in two shops owned by the same pharmacist, during which she is the sole pharmacist on the premises. This has been within the parameters of her qualification as set out by the Pharmaceutical Society of Ireland at the time of conferral. The only limitation on a Pharmaceutical Assistant's qualification is that he or she cannot own a retail pharmacy, or be in "whole time" charge of one. Pharmaceutical Assistants (PA) do the exact same job as a pharmacist outside of this limitation; in fact, most people would not even know whether or not their local pharmacist is a PA or a registered pharmacist. If these rules become law, my mother will, at best, lose hours, at worst, she will lose her job, with very little chance of finding another position. She is 59 years old, has worked in the same career for over 40 years, and is paying a mortgage. She has 6 years to retirement. The loss of these hours will have a massive detrimental effect on her and her security. There are almost 400 PAs still working; they have decades of experience, and they will be forced out of the workforce by the PSI if these rules are allowed to be amended. The PSI stopped conferring this qualification in 1985, which is why there is such a small number of them today. The last PAs will be retired in 10-or-so years. To restrict their working hours so drastically will force pharmacists to hire registered pharmacists in their place, because a PA will no longer be able to cover holidays or emergencies. For example, a colleague of my mother's was recently called in to work because her boss was rushed to hospital: if these rules were in place, her boss would have had no choice but to close his business because it was too late to bring in a locum; this would in turn mean patients - particularly those with repreat prescriptions held by this pharmacy - would have been unable to get their - often vital - medication. This colleague ended up working 2 weeks of full time hours; this is entirely within keeping of the qualification as it stands today. If these rules passed, the pharmacist would have had to bring in a locum for the majority of those hours, meaning his business would have been cared for by an unknown employee, rather than the perfectly competent, capable and qualified PA on his staff. These rules are unworkable and unfair; they will have the very real effect of forcing people in their mid-fifties to their early sixties out of the workforce, suddenly unqualified for something they have been deemed qualified for since the 70s and 80s.
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    Created by Ailbhe Byrne