• Cork Hospital Cycleway
    Imagine cycling safely from Cork University Hospital/Cork University Maternity Hospital to Grand Parade and on to the South Infirmary Victoria University Hospital, all the while separated from cars and HGV trucks by protective barriers. On the way you pass the Bon Secours Hospital, UCC and the Mercy University Hospital. Health care workers have always cycled to work, and between the various city hospital campuses. But during the COVID19 pandemic, they were given a glimpse of what it might be like to cycle safely on the then quieter streets. The traffic is back. Now as lockdown eases we urge Cork City Council to boldly implement measures that will protect us, and all citizens of Cork, who make these journeys. Clapping for healthcare workers is easy. Making the city better for all citizens requires vision and leadership. The people of Cork were recently asked through social media: Would you like to see your front-line healthcare workers protected on their way to and from work? The response was unanimous: YES! #CorkHospitalCycleway. A protected cycleway. If this is something you'd be interested in? We'd love to hear from you. Are you a healthcare worker, patient, student or local business? What would this mean to you? Where do you work? Tell us your story… We will pass on your views to the various executives in our hospitals, UCC, Cork City Council. Let us remember the recent losses and sacrifices made by our front-line workers, by enacting a real and positive change to transform our city into a healthier, safer and more caring place to live and work.
    3,223 of 4,000 Signatures
    Created by IDE Irish Doctors for the Environment
  • Save Cavan Midwifery Led Unit (MLU)
    A still unknown decision has led to the MLU in Cavan being effectively closed in all but name under the guise of a merger with the consultant-led unit. This may be the third time Cavan MLU has faced closure and the pregnant people in the area have faced limitation of their care choices. The effective closure of the Midwifery-Led Unit on Monday 1st of June 2020 and the manner in which this decision has been taken, with no public consultation or formal announcement from either Cavan General Hospital or the RSCI group, who we understand are leading of this decision, shows a clear lack of understanding to the needs of those in the surrounding area. The claim that it is not a downgrading of service provision is simply false. For all who have accessed the MLU, either as a service user, healthcare professional or student, this closure will have significant impact on practice and care provision. To our knowledge, no rationale has been given to explain the decision. National and international evidence supports the expansion of midwifery led services. Closure of the unit limits choices for pregnancy care in direct opposition of this evidence. We cannot emphasise strongly enough 1. The retrograde nature of this decision which flies in the face of all the international evidence on best birth practices 2. And which spells the death knell of the 2016 Maternity Strategy which was specifically committed to the expansion of MLUs, not their closure Our model of maternity care relies on the majority of women going through a system of GP referral to an obstetric unit or maternity hospital. Despite the National Maternity Strategy, the dominant model of care across all our 19 maternity units is a consultant-led model of care. We have only the two midwifery-led units in Ireland (Cavan and Drogheda) and midwifery clinics across the maternity system are far too few. -- In international terms, our model of maternity care does not offer women choice of models of maternity care, something the National Maternity Strategy acknowledges clearly. Indeed, the Irish model of maternity care is at odds with best international evidence on the effectiveness of models of maternity care - The 2016 National Maternity Strategy, called for many more MLUs to be built. Instead this has not only been completely stalled - its implementation committee has met only four times up to 2019 (PQ 14615-19; PQ 14616) and the budget of the strategy has been slashed - The HIQA maternity report (February 2020) highlighted the lack of progress in supported care pathways under the National Maternity Strategy The 2003 Hanly Report on medical staffing with its overall aim of increasing still further centralisation of all hospital services continues to cast a shadow over the relevance of the small Cavan MLU – which has never had the full support of senior clinical and management staff in Cavan. If it had, it would be used to capacity and would not now be ‘merged’ with the consultant-led services. Who is affected? *this is not an exhaustive list of affected groups* Pregnant people are entitled to choice in care provision. There is no evidence at present to show that this has been supported or considered in the move to close the Cavan MLU. We hope to hear from service users to determine what plans are in place for those currently booked in the unit, those who were potentially being transferred back to the service following obstetric assessment, and those who had previously or planned to access midwifery led care in Cavan. Supporting practitioners in the Cavan/Monaghan area to continue the provision of Midwifery Led Care is vital. Evidence of support and solutions offered thus far to the midwives within the unit is needed so that as a national community of professionals and experts in normal pregnancy care can come together to save Cavan MLU. Midwives are the experts in providing pregnancy care and a wealth of evidence supports this model, referred to as “supported care” in the Maternity Strategy. Student midwives who began their training from 2018 in Dundalk Institute of Technology must complete Midwifery Led Unit placement experience as a core area, a change from its specialist area status before 2018. This reflects the importance of midwifery led care experience in well rounded learning. If Cavan MLU were to close, students would be limited to the Drogheda MLU to achieve the hours in order to qualify and register as midwives. It is already difficult for these MLU hours to be achieved between two units with the number of students requiring the necessary time in midwifery led services. The limitations that this closure will place on students has immediate and long-term consequences. Students in the 2019 cohort were due to attend Cavan MLU for placement in March/April and must make up this time due to COVID19. These students are now in limbo regarding completing these hours and gaining critical core learning experience. USEFUL LINKS; National Maternity Strategy 2016-2026 >> https://www.gov.ie/en/publication/0ac5a8-national-maternity-strategy-creating-a-better-future-together-2016-2/ HIQA Maternity Services report February 2020 >> https://www.hiqa.ie/sites/default/files/2020-02/Maternity-Overview-Report.pdf HSE / TCD 2009 MidU study >> https://nursing-midwifery.tcd.ie/assets/publications/pdf/midu-report.pdf Association for Improvements in the Maternity Service Ireland - Midwifery Led Care information >> http://aimsireland.ie/midwife-led-care/#:~:text=Midwife%2Dled%20services%20for%20eligible,further%20attention%20 AIMSI “What Matters to You” Survey 2014/2015 >> http://aimsireland.ie/care-choices/ Bump2Babe – Cavan General Hospital survey answers CLU >> http://www.bump2babe.ie/all-answers/unit/0/ MLU >> http://www.bump2babe.ie/all-answers/unit/1/
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    Created by Laura Henry
  • Runwood Homes must pay it's own staff
    According to their accounts, Runwood Homes made a profit of almost £15 million last year. They have a record of numerous failings and examples of poor care and ill treatment at many of the eleven care homes they run in Northern Ireland. These include Clifton Nursing Home where nine residents died of Covid 19, and which is now subject to an official review. Despite this the company are set to receive money from an £11.7 million grant from the public purse to pay staff on sick leave, and purchase specialist equipment.
    5 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Nicola Browne
  • Stop shutting out our vulnerable from our parks
    Everyone deserves to enjoy the beauty of a local park and that includes Daniel and his family. Dan has Sotos Syndrome and goes out daily with his amazing parents, Sinead and Keith for runs in his special buggy. Running the park, chatting to locals and saying hello has been a highlight, especially during C-19 as all day services etc. are closed. Now with these new gates, the Tighe family along with lots of other families are now PROHIBITED from entering our parks. This is wrong and SDCC need to remove this prison like gates and let those who are in wheelchairs etc. use the park like everyone else.
    831 of 1,000 Signatures
    Created by Sue O'Grady
  • Dublin's Health Emergency We need public toilet & hand washing facilities.
    My name is Richard Hanlon a co-owner of Busyfeet & Coco Cafe Dublin's oldest Fair-trade Cafe on South William street established in 2001. My concern is the lack of availability of public toilets in Dublin's city centre currently and into the future, with only 2 public toilets operational at Connelly & Hueston stations for a city of 650k people at this time. The current crisis has accentuated the urgent issue of the city’s poor hygiene infrastructure which will have an adverse effect on both public health and the survival of city centre commercial areas.  Under the road map to reopen Ireland’s society and economy we will move from Phase 1 to Phase 2 on June 8th. This will mean significantly increased movement of citizens and an influx to the city which will be a major event within Dublin. This also will be a key economic turning point for the Dublin city center commerce, but due to ongoing restrictions there will be no accessible toilet or handwashing facilities for the public to use till Phase 3 June 28th. When some hospitality  and retailers  could allow access to their loos. As an SME operator of coffee shops in both the city centre and suburbs, I am acutely aware of my customers requirement for easily accessible toilets. It is also very clear that the demands between the city and suburbs are vastly different during these times. People using suburban hospitality venues such as neighbourhood cafes for takeaway are within easy access of their own homes and bathroom facilities. The 20 days period between Phase 2 & 3 will be a pivotal time for businesses in the city, who badly need to reopen and help kickstart the economy. The “No Place to Go” feeling will be a negative consequence of having no temporary public toilets available from June 8th in Dublin city centre, making returning custom much less unlikely ‘A first impression is a lasting impression to a customer’.  In a survey more than half agreed that the lack of public toilets stopped them from going out as often as they would like. Any further loss to future trade in the coming months in the city centre will be devastating economically, pushing most businesses to bankruptcy. The ‘Urinary leash’ will not only hold back all of us from venturing into the city center but it will hold back the country.  There have been too many years of debating and deliberating about public toilets and in 2018 the Green Party hailed the achievement of 300k allocation of funds for public toilets, but this was never used and on the 25th May 2020 meetings with DCC called for temporary public toilets to be facilitated ahead of Phase 2 June 8th, but no budget or allocation could be agreed. Why is it so difficult to talk toilets in a modern age?  Dublin is Ireland’s economic engine and  250,000 people work in Dublin 1 and 2 alone.  On average, 300,000 people visit Dublin city centre each day, but with the expected drop in footfall due to working from home requirements, reduced transport capacity and social distancing the hospitality sector alone is looking to operate at a maximum of c.45% capacity.  We could be looking at up to 150,000 less people a day, which will mean the closure of many.  Without the hospitality sector there will be no adequate toilet facilities within Dublin City, so we must come up with a solution for both short term and long term so we can maintain Dublin City as an attractive destination.  Who will return to the city centre, when they cannot find toilets and handwashing places during this COVID 19 crisis? Would you?  Without people, we have no commerce and Dublin has no future. Dublin City Council has to spend more than a penny now and act for the people of Dublin, so let's see them make a positive move soon and save our Dublin city’s heart from dirt, dereliction and disintegration. City councillors and local politicians are eager to promote the rapid implementation of pedestrianisation of central zones and push for increased cycling as an important step to our future, even during this current health emergency. However, we should be reminded of our past where cycling and public toilets were commonplace and interlinked as we travelled further from our home privies.  Does the council want to add to the increased unsanitary practices which are currently taking place in the city? Does the council want to force the public into a situation in which they are unable to wash their hands, when the HSE & our Taoiseach are telling us that it is essential to public health? DCC need to act swiftly or further compound the the ability of the city commercial areas to survive.
    652 of 800 Signatures
    Created by Richard Hanlon
  • Sack Dominic Cummings
    Dominic Cummings has broken the lockdown rules, at a time when the rest of the public were making huge personal, emotional and financial sacrifices to halt the spread of Covid 19.
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    Created by Nicola Browne
  • Safe Access to Bull Island
    This amenity is very important and has been enjoyed by thousands of people during COVID-19 restriction as a safe place for recreation to walk and cycle with plenty of space for physical distancing. With the lifting of car restrictions onto the Causeway and the Wooden bridge of 18th May it will no longer be possible for the majority of people of all ages to continue to enjoy this amenity safely. Bull Island is an important protected biosphere and it should be kept free from air pollution. It is the stated aim of Dublin City Council to encourage cycling and walking.
    1,675 of 2,000 Signatures
    Created by Donna Cooney
  • Make Wooden Bridge & Causeway to Bullwall car free once more
    The health & well being of Dubliners depends on it.
    349 of 400 Signatures
    Created by Austin Keegan
  • Stop the development of a dangerous asphalt plant in Burnfoot, Co. Donegal
    Plans have been submitted to Donegal County Council (March 2021) for an asphalt plant to be developed in Gortnaskea, Burnfoot, Co.Donegal. The development will take place behind a large quarry at the foot of the Scalp Mountain. It will be a seven days a week operation producing up to 100,000 tonnes per year. Asphalt plants mix sand and gravel with crude oil derivatives to make asphalt to pave roads, carparks etc. They have a huge impact from both an environment and a public health perspective. They release harmful chemicals into the air during production including arsenic, benzene, formaldehyde and cadmium. Exposure to these toxins can cause cancer, central nervous system issues, respiratory problems and skin irritations. Animal studies have shown that Polycylic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH's) effect reproduction, cause birth defects, and cause damage the the immune system. We want Donegal County Council to take notice of these grave concerns and to refuse planning permission for this development. Please sign to support and protect our community's environment and health, and to show that public health is more important that private wealth.
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    Created by South Inishowen Against Asphalt
  • Full Abortion Care in Northern Ireland
    The Department of Health NI are refusing to commission abortion services, despite regulations now in place which make abortion provision a legal requirement. This means that only limited abortion access has been provided and too many women and pregnant people have been refused treatment and told to travel. The Minister for Health has also stated this limited access is an ‘interim’ measure only, which means that there has been NO attempt by the Department to commission fitting, adequate and permanent abortion provision we need. We have the law. Now we need the access.
    1,305 of 2,000 Signatures
    Created by Nicola Browne
  • Say No To Mow in Co. Cork
    During this pandemic, many of our green areas have been allowed to grow wild, with no council mowing ongoing. Which is great! Green areas have been allowed to flourish with flowers growing through them. Widespread population declines of bees and other pollinators from habitat loss are a growing concern. However, spontaneous flowers like dandelions and clover can provide pollen and nectar sources throughout the growing season....... Therefore, please don't mow, don't spray, let them grow!
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    Created by Alice Glendinning
  • Shut down Moy Park for Covid19 Testing
    Yesterday it was reported that a female worker from East Timor, Luciana Viviana da Silva (58), who worked at Moy Park’s Dungannon site, died from coronavirus. Covid19 clusters are rising in workplaces in the meat and poultry industries, which have been recognised to be particularly high risk for workers. Action must be taken now to ensure the scale of outbreaks in meat industry in the USA and Brazil are not repeated in Northern Ireland.
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    Created by Nicola Browne