• Save the "Port Of Cork Buildings" from being destroyed by a horrific modern development
    The Port Of Cork Buildings have been bought by American property developers recently. They plan to build the biggest skyscraper in Ireland on this site. It will cover up and destroy the Port buildings, these are the most historical, prominent, visually beautiful buildings in Cork City. The Port of Cork Buildings are listed buildings, they are supposed to be protected. Cork City Council has been allowing so many historical buildings in Cork City to be demolished, their idea of preserving buildings is to keep the front wall, (Some examples Navagation House by O Callaghan Properties and Camden Quay buildings demolished leaving only the front walls, another horrible example is the O Callaghan Properties development on Lavits Quay. Opera Lane didn’t even bother keeping the front and now Patrick’s Street has started losing its character and historic buildings). The Port buildings were constructed during the Napoleonic Wars by the prisoners of Spike Island more than 200 years ago. They are in such an important piece of strategic land in the center of the city and on the historic waterfront. These are the first buildings we see when we arrive in Cork. They have the possibility to make this city very special. These are a unique set of buildings and part of our cultural and historical maritime heritage - of international interest. If this huge development goes ahead the character of Cork will be lost forever. I have had a campaign to get these amazing buildings turned into a Port Of Cork Maritime Museum. They are in such an important piece of strategic land in the center of the city and on the historic waterfront. The idea of the Maritime Museum in this location would connect the City to The Harbour and would provide a perfect opportunity for ferry's to bring the people of Cork and tourists up and down the river Lee from Cork to the amazing Harbour and Spike Island. If a Maritime Museum was the chosen usage of these buildings open to the people of the city we could have amazing public civic occasions on this magical important strategic site. It is a disgrace on our politicians and planners, that they have allowed these amazing buildings to go into private ownership. I am inviting people who are interested in these buildings to contact me and campaign and make them into an important maritime civic amenity. Regards, John Adams johnadamsartist@gmail.com
    1,680 of 2,000 Signatures
    Created by John Adams Picture
  • Reverse the decision to abolish the Department of the Environment
    Taoiseach Enda Kenny announced the restructuring of ministerial departments to better reflect the new government’s priorities and then promptly abolished the Department of the Environment. This does not bode well for this government’s future plans for Ireland’s environment. In fact it indicates a blatant disregard for a healthy environment and its importance to a healthy economy and society. Not only have the words ‘environment’ ‘heritage’ and ‘community’ been culled from the titles of all departments, but the programme for government doesn’t even include a section on the environment and nowhere does it mention nature or water protection. This flies in the face of the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals, which the Taoiseach signed up to just six months ago and which clearly state that environment, society, and economy are equal and interdependent. Environmental functions traditionally housed under a single department have also been split, spreading waste, water and wildlife across three Departments. This fragmentation further weakens the impact of environmental considerations on government decision-making and hampers a cohesive approach to environmental protection. By reintegrating environmental functions under one minister the Government would be recognizing both the innate value of the Irish environment and our moral and legal obligations to protect, restore and enhance our environment for current and future generations. Otherwise Ireland will be the only EU Member State with no Minister of the Environment, a matter of considerable international embarrassment.
    13,729 of 15,000 Signatures
    Created by Friends of the Earth, VOICE, BirdWatch, An Taisce, Irish Wildlife Trust
  • Supporting College Green Plaza
    Cycling already accounts for 27% of all traffic on Dame Street, making it the most popular cycling area in Dublin, in spite of the current hostile conditions. With an expanding population and national policy to increase the share of walking and cycling trips across the city to 25% in the coming years, this area needs to be equipped to handle a proportionate increase. We’re calling on the City Council to guarantee the delivery of a new College Green that meets the needs for current cycling and walking volumes and is future-proofed for projected demand. The area needs to deliver for all users of the space, no matter where they’re coming from or going to, whether they’re walking through or lingering; whether cycling with children or cycling to work. The needs of visually impaired people, deaf people, children and the elderly need to be catered for at the proposed plaza in particular. The tried and tested Dutch model for cycling, employing high quality segregated routes and widespread permeability, is the only proven way to realise truly inclusive levels of cycling. Cycle flows must have the same attention to detail as public transport to unlock the true potential of cycling in Dublin. We’re concerned that the latest drawings do not convey this. Specifically, we’re calling for: A detailed design that takes advantage of the principles of sustainable safety and does not use shared walking and cycling areas, in accordance with section 1.9.3 of the National Cycling Manual (NCM). We view this as central to the success or failure of the plaza; Use of self-enforcing separated cycle tracks which are well-defined visually and spatially, using angled kerbs, grade-separation and colouring to create new bike permeability for Trinity, Dame Street, Grafton Street Quarter, O’Connell Street and other destinations in the area; Use of bus stop bypasses at all stops on Dame Street and all other possible measures to separate busses and cycles in the area, including bidirectional paths in accordance with the NCM/Design Manual for Urban Roads and Streets requirements. 660 Dubliners have already backed our calls for improved walking and cycling commitments in this year’s City Development Plan, joining almost 8000 overwhelmingly positive submissions on the 2015 Dublin City Centre Transport Study. The leading business groups have also backed the College Green proposals, which will make the city even more attractive to the world’s leading companies and their workers. The council has already shown what quality cycling routes can achieve in Dublin with the Grand Canal Cycleway. It’s now time to build on that success.
    984 of 1,000 Signatures
    Created by Kevin O'Farrell Picture
  • End Fluoridation in the water supply
    Because fluoride is a nasty chemical which should not be in the people's water supply The Republic of Ireland (not Northern Ireland) is now one of the last places in Europe that still poison the people's water supply and pay for the privilege. Europe Out of a population of about three-quarters of a billion, under 14 million people (approximately a mere 2%) in Europe receive artificially fluoridated water. Those people are in the UK (5,797,000), Republic of Ireland (3,250,000), Spain (4,250,000), and Serbia (300,000).[9] The first water fluoridation in Europe was in West Germany and Sweden in 1952, bringing fluoridated water to about 42,000 people. By mid-1962, about 1 million Europeans in 18 communities in 11 countries were receiving fluoridated water.[44] Many European countries have rejected water fluoridation in general. This including Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Northern Ireland, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland,[45] Scotland,[46] Iceland, and Italy. A 2003 survey of over 500 Europeans from 16 countries concluded that "the vast majority of people are opposed water fluoridation". IRELAND The majority of drinking water is fluoridated. Around 2012, 3.25 million people received artificially-fluoridated water.[9] 71% of the population in 2002 resided in fluoridated communities.[60] The fluoridation agent used is hydro fluorosilicic acid (HFSA; H2SiF6).[61] In a 2002 public survey, 45% of respondents expressed some concern about fluoridation.[62] In 1957, the Department of Health established a Fluorine Consultative Council which recommended fluoridation at 1.0 ppm of public water supplies, then accessed by ~50% of the population.[63] This was felt to be a much cheaper way of improving the quality of children's teeth than employing more dentists.[64] This led to the Health (Fluoridation of Water Supplies) Act 1960, which mandated compulsory fluoridation by local authorities.[64][65] The statutory instruments made in 1962–65 under the 1960 Act were separate for each local authority, setting the level of fluoride in drinking water to 0.8–1.0 ppm.[66][67] The current regulations date from 2007 and set the level to 0.6–0.8 ppm, with a target value of 0.7 ppm.[68] Implementation of fluoridation was held up by preliminary dental surveying and water testing,[69] and a court case, Ryan v. Attorney General.[70] In 1965, the Supreme Court rejected Gladys Ryan's claim that the Act violated the Constitution of Ireland's guarantee of the right to bodily integrity.[70][71] By 1965, Greater Dublin's water was fluoridated; by 1973, other urban centres were.[72] Studies from the late 1970s to mid-1990s showed a higher decrease in (and lower incidence of) dental decay in school children living in areas where water was fluoridated than in areas where water was not fluoridated.[73] A private member's bill to end fluoridation was defeated in the Dáil on 12 November 2013.[74][75] It was supported by Sinn Féin and some of the technical group and opposed by the Fine Gael-Labour government and Fianna Fáil.[75][76][77] Recently there is much local opposition to the national fluoridation mandate. Early in 2014, Cork County Council and Laois County Council passed motions for the cessation of water fluoridation. In Autumn 2014, Cork City Council, Dublin City Council,[58][59] and Kerry County Council passed similar motions. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fluoridation_by_country There is no evidence that it really improves or is good for your teeth but there is REAL evidence that it damages your brain and causes thyroid problems in women
    97 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Emmett Brady
  • Make Orange Juice Fair!
    While retailers across Europe make enormous profits from the sale of store brand (own brand) orange juice, the majority of workers and farmers who harvest and process the fruit and its juice live in bitter poverty. Orange juice production is also utterly destructive to the environment; the industry is characterised by excessive use of pesticides.
    19 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Shauna Kelly
  • Create a Citizens' Convention for a Post-Carbon Ireland
    Since pre-industrial times, our world has warmed by a global average of almost 1 degree celsius, due primarily to greenhouse gas pollution from human activities. This has already triggered serious planetary-scale climate disruption, and is having devastating humanitarian impacts on vulnerable communities in diverse geographical regions. But we are not powerless. We can still act: both to limit the speed and ultimate severity of global climate impacts, and to brace our own society for the potentially drastic shocks ahead due to the climate disruptions we have already initiated. This will require urgent and radical societal transformation. That can only happen with the willing engagement and support of the people. We need a genuine, sustained process that allows every single citizen and community in Ireland to fully consider the range and nature of the changes we face, and to advance policies and actions that are commensurate with them. Only in this way can we hope to create the unity and solidarity that is essential to create a strong, resilent, and genuinely sustainable society. We need a Citizens' Convention for a Post-Carbon Ireland.
    925 of 1,000 Signatures
    Created by Barry McMullin
  • Failte Ireland/WAW take away the hideous sign at the Flaggy Shore Beach, Co. Clare NOW
    The Flaggy Shore is a beautiful, unspoilt piece of County Clare, enjoyed by many. Today, the people who run Failte/Discover Ireland/Wild Atlantic Way erected a hideous steel sign at the beach end of the Flaggy Shore. No one living along or near to the Flaggy Shore was consulted about this sign. We do NOT want it, nor do the many visitors to the Flaggy Shore. We ask that you TAKE IT AWAY NOW!! How about investing our money in the development of the roads along the Wild Atlantic Way??? PLEASE, remove this insulting sign at once.
    35 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Adelia Greer
  • No othophosphate in our drinking water
    As Limerick City is on an estuary, it is expected that any problems caused by excess amounts of Orthophosphate entering the Shannon from households in the city will be mitigated by the tidal movements of the estuary. This is not good environmental practice and is simply fixing one problem by creating another problem. There are two solutions that can solve the problem of lead in water. One solution is to completely remove and replace all old lead piping, lead fixtures and lead fittings in the plumbing system of the house. The other solution which may also be less costly, is to add a water filter or filtration system that will remove metals like lead and other contaminants and ensure the drinking water supply is pure and safe to drink. There are also health issues with the use of this chemical not just the fact there adding it to water already effected by fluoride. The phosphate in sodium phosphate can cause calcification of your organs, the University of Maryland Medical Centre notes. Phosphate sometimes causes your soft tissue to calcify as well. When your organs and soft tissue become calcified, your ability to utilize minerals such as iron, calcium, magnesium and zinc becomes impaired. These minerals are vital to the proper function of your body. Being unable to properly utilize them will lead to further problems and complications. Sodium phosphate has been associated with severe kidney damage, sometimes requiring dialysis, according to a 2009 article in PubMed Health. Kidney damage is associated with dehydration and constipation. Dizziness and decreased urination also can indicate kidney damage, but a biopsy offers more conclusive proof of kidney damage. Consuming it more frequently than once every seven days might elevate your risk of developing kidney damage, according to MedlinePlus. Sometimes sodium phosphate causes severe allergic reactions characterized by hives or skin rashes that appear all over your body, as well as itching and breathing difficulties. Allergic reactions also can cause your chest and throat to feel tight. Blood sometimes appears in your stool. Your facial area will also swell when you experience an allergic reaction. During a severe allergic reaction, your arms and legs sometimes also swell. Confusion, arrhythmia and headaches are also symptoms associated with severe allergic reactions. Seizures and potential loss of consciousness are also typical symptoms of a severe allergic reaction. And already common in our current supply I have been sending letters, Emails etc. to this company for months regarding the Orthophosphate trials in Limerick and Clare.What we want is for them to send a spokes person to Limerick for a public consultation with the residents and citizens who will be effected by this.If they are a genuine company that have any regard for its customers and if this Phosphate is 100% safe then I don't see why they are refusing. We will welcome them and organise a venue This orthophosphate is been used as an escuse not to repair our infrastructure which is on its last legs.Once that falls apart they will sell to the higest bidder and our water will be lost.Ask Berlin about that one or veolia So please help us keep the pressure on we only have weeks left as its going in without our consent in the first quarter of 2016
    219 of 300 Signatures
    Created by Greg Doran
  • Poster Free Elections
    Most of us will agree that it is not in any way going to make us choose a candidate based on a picture . Big parties have big budgets and can take over an area. They are unsightly and create an untidy look wherever they are. A person's ability to run for election should not be counted by the amount of times their face is replicated.
    40 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Brigid Dervan
  • No to More Slash and Burn!
    The proposed changes to the Wildlife Act will allow for the burning of vegetation in March and the cutting of hedgerows in August. This decision will have serious impact on a range of wildlife species and habitats in Ireland - especially highly-threatened nesting birds and pollinators found in our hedgerows and uplands. Our hedgerows are a vital refuge for many native wildlife species in a landscape with little native woodland compared to other countries. Hedgerows provide food, shelter, nesting sites, habitat corridors and are an essential component for flood defenses, preventing soil erosion and the silting of rivers as well as carbon sequestration. Our hedgerows and upland habitats need proper management, though. Landowners and farmers must be supported to manage them in a way that works for farming, road safety and wildlife. Under existing rules, landowners have six months between September and February to manage hedgerows and uplands effectively and there is provision for hedgecutting for safety on our roads. Therefore, this decision is unwarranted, will cause a significant blow to already threatened wildlife species and goes against advice submitted by Birdwatch Ireland, An Taisce and the Irish Wildlife Trust. The change to the hedge-cutting dates will lead to further declines in populations of Red-listed Yellowhammer, Linnet and Greenfinch birds and reduce essential food supplies for pollinators, of which a third are threatened with extinction. Our upland breeding birds are experiencing significant declines with several species now of Conservation Concern, including the Red-listed Curlew, Golden Plover and Meadow Pipit. Breeding Curlew have experienced an almost 80% decline in the last 40 years. How sad it will be to lose the Cry of the Curlew in our lifetimes. Many of our upland habitats are of international importance and protected under the EU Habitats Directive. These habitats also provide a range of benefits to humans such as carbon sequestration, water filtration and attenuation to protect against floods. Why then is the Minister supporting any burning in the uplands given the fragile state of its wildlife and habitats? By allowing burning of our uplands into March, nesting activities of sensitive upland ground-nesting birds will be affected along with the breeding success of these populations. We ask you to join us in our campaign to persuade the Government to reverse this decision before the Heritage Bill 2016, is passed through the Oireachtas. Sign our petition to show your support for the wildlife that do not have a voice. If we do nothing, we risk losing yet more of our natural heritage here in Ireland. Join us and support “No to More Slash and Burn!”
    33,483 of 35,000 Signatures
    Created by Irish Wildlife Trust, Birdwatch Ireland, An Taisce and Hedge Laying Association of Ireland
  • Declare Clare a TTIP Free Zone
    Our local businesses, environment and democracy are under threat from a trade deal currently being negotiated between the EU Commission and the USA. The deal is called TTIP and could outlaw local authorities’ support of local businesses, allow multinational corporations to sue us if councils deny fracking permits and open up services like water, health and education to privatisation. What’s up for grabs are the rules and regulations that force corporations to abide by standards that protect our health, our rights, our jobs, services and the environment. These regulations for example stop corporations releasing chemicals and products into the market before they are proven to be safe. They also make sure workers get their rights and that local communities are protected from environmental disasters. But if TTIP goes ahead corporations will get to have a say on policies that govern our daily lives - before we or even politicians get to see them. And if they don’t like the rules they will be able to sue governments when they make changes or bring in new policies that could potentially affect their profits. Right now in Canada a fracking company Lone Pine Resources Inc., is suing the government for its decision to not allow fracking in Quebec. They are able to do this because of an ISDS clause in another trade deal. In Egypt the government was sued by water company Veolia for attempting to bring in a minimum wage. Germany is being sued by Swedish energy company Vatenfall for €4.7 billion because of Germany's decision to phase out nuclear power. TTIP also removes barriers to US companies who want to sell their products in Europe. Right now the sale of US beef in Europe is very limited. Hormone injected beef is banned outright. Hundreds of councils across Europe have already said they don’t want TTIP. Because of people power politicians are waking up to the threat TTIP poses and to the fact that people aren’t going to stand aside and let our democracy and rights be sold off.
    604 of 800 Signatures
    Created by John Higgins
  • More than sweeping brushes - support for communities at risk of flooding
    As a family, we have experienced two major flooding incidents - our family home in Galway in September 2015 and my mother's home a number of years ago - followed by a near escape over Christmas in my mother's home. In the days following Christmas, we witnessed elderly people and families using sweeping brushes and wheelie bins to bail water in an attempt to protect their homes, homes that had already been destroyed a few years earlier. The impact on other communities around the country was, in this instance, far worse. Flooding, and the fear of it that permeates communities prone, is life -destroying. People need to be equipped and supported to protect their homes and businesses. The inevitability of these events needs to be conceded and the promises of action that we have been hearing needs to happen now. In terms of crisis response (prevention is a whole other story) in the immediate term; • There needs to be local co-ordination and a crisis response plan in areas that are prone to flooding, including a text alert system to people willing to help; • There should be a store of sand-bags in these areas. Easy-to-store sand-bags (five in a box about the size of a lap-top box) are now available, but these are generally distributed far too late. In our own case we got a delivery of sand-bags the day after the flood. That evening a local politician sourced them and while it wasn’t too late, it would have been far better if they had been available earlier; • At one stage the fire brigade brought a small pump and generator and this cleared the water out of the worst affected homes in a few minutes – work that had taken us all night. These should be available in all flood prone areas and training provided to local people to be able to use it; • People in these areas should receive grants to install flood-barriers – these work unless the flood is overwhelming; • Guarantees that either insurance companies will be required to provide flood insurance or a national insurance fund is established.
    326 of 400 Signatures
    Created by Ann Irwin