• A Community Garden in the Clonskeagh/Dundrum Area
    The garden's aim is to produce local food and teach gardening techniques. Empowering people to produce their own food is especially important during this time of financial, societal and climate upheaval. The community garden will be totally run by volunteers, and consistently monitored by a committee. Benefits of Community Gardens Health Community gardens increase the public access to affordable, fresh, healthy food (1). People who participate in community gardens, on average, increase their fruit consumption by 10% (1) and areas with community gardens have less obesity (3). The act of gardening is a form of exercise and so participation in community gardens promotes physical activity (1,3). Urban agriculture is also linked to reductions in stress and positive mental health especially for those suffering from mental health problems (3). Community gardens generally promote public health and improve quality of life (1) Community Community gardens promote connection with the earth and with other people (7). Working with each other and sharing resources and time builds social relationships and stronger communities. Participation in community gardens is linked with increased voter registration, civic responsibility, and reduced rates of crime (3). Compared to other communal green spaces community gardens are small scale, low cost and highly used. Community garden areas of public parks see more visits than any other part of the park (2). Resilient Food System and Sustainability Urban agriculture increases food accessibility and local food security (3,1). This is of great significance to food insecure households (3). According to Safefood.eu, one in ten households in Ireland in 2018 suffered from food poverty (8). People who grow their own food, or are a part of a community garden save money by supplementing the food they buy (3). In Seattle growers were able to supplement their produce by 30-40% (3). Many urban agriculture projects produce more than they can consume and donate the excess food to community members and food banks (3). Increasing urban agriculture increases the resilience and sustainability of the city’s food system and reduces reliance on imported produce (3). This is especially relevant in the wake of the coronavirus. Local food is generally considered to be more sustainable because of the carbon cost associated with travel. Education Community gardens can be a great platform for skill shares and events like gardening workshops, and gardening tutoring, taste-testing events or discussion events (1). In one study 20% of students that started gardening in the community garden began gardening at home (1). Community gardens can be used by local schools. This is greatly beneficial for children as gardening helps develop fine motor skills and teaches them about patience, science and where their food comes from (2). Community gardens can host a variety of workshops and help people develop tangible agricultural and organisational skills (3). References 1.Community Gardens: Lessons Learned From California Healthy Cities and Communities | Joan Twiss, MA, Joy Dickinson, BS, CHES, Shirley Duma, MA, Tanya Kleinman, BA, Heather Paulsen, MS, and Liz Rilveria, MPA 2. Community Gardening By Katherine L. Adam NCAT Agriculture Specialist Published January 2011, 3.The Intersection of Planning, Urban Agriculture, and Food Justice: A Review of the Literature Megan Horst, Nathan McClintock & Lesli Hoey 4. Multifunctional Urban Agriculture for Sustainable Land Use Planning in the United States Sarah Taylor Lovell 5.Alma Anne Clavin (2011) Realising ecological sustainability in community gardens: a capability approach, Local Environment, 16:10, 945-962, DOI: 10.1080/13549839.2011.627320 6.The motivations and experiences of community garden participants in Edinburgh, Scotland David McVey, Robert Nash & Paul Stansbie 7.It takes a garden: Cultivating citizen-subjects in organized garden projects Mary BethPudup 8. https://www.safefood.eu/News/2019/New-research-reveals-households-on-low-incomes-need-to-spend-up-to-1-3-of-take-home-income-to-afford.aspx
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    Created by Saoirse Sheehy Ariff
  • Community Objection to a Quarry in Raphoe
    Bonar's Quarries are seeking permission for 25 years to open an old quarry that has already adversely affected the lives of residents of this heritage town under planning number 1952015. It has gone unnoticed by most of the community during the COVID-19 pandemic but those who remember the building damage, noise pollution, air pollution and misery caused when this quarry was last operated will not want it to return. Unbelievably, the proposal is within just 800 metres of some 23 homes, a secondary school, businesses, multiple farms and within 1 km of Raphoe, a heritage town with a population of over 1000 people and with huge historical and cultural significance. Raphoe is also home to three other schools, a cathedral, a chapel, churches, numerous businesses including a livestock mart, a tourism attraction in Oakfield Park, forestry and many farms. We oppose the noise, dust, vehicular traffic, the safety record of the applicant, water pollution, vibration, the location and the release of any poisonous landfill leachate into aquifers, and second the views of the 18 page objection already lodged. There are many more suitable locations for a quarry but this one, on the edge of our town, simply must not go ahead. Therefore we need as many people as possible to CLICK BELOW TO BACK THIS PETITION and oppose living beside a functioning quarry in Raphoe for the next 25 years.
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    Created by Raphoe Community
  • Please don’t postpone the Leaving Cert for so long
    It has been difficult to keep the spirits up during confinement, knowing the end of the effort wasn’t so far away, or wasted, kept the focus and the effort going. The news of the long deferral have so deflated the LC students, who were studying so hard up to now. I worry about the consequences this decision might have on their resolve up to now. It would also interfere with plans to study abroad, and would have further implications regarding college entry, after correcting time is added in. Times are tough, but there’s no need to dismantle everything and take the carpet from under their feet. College classes can be taken online, exams can be scheduled in a way that social distancing is adhered to.
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    Created by Elena Lopez Sweeney
  • Cancelling CBAs across Ireland
    Due to the coronavirus schools across Ireland have been cancelled, despite this the second years are still having to complete the CBAs (classroom based assessments). This is unfair as every other year group that have completed them received a better opportunity to get help. The current second years deserve the same platform that previous students have had. Because of the current situation, there is a lot of unnecessary stress and confusion being caused.
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    Created by Natalie Bradshaw
  • Partial Refund of Tuition Fees
    Most students and families often struggle to put together college fees, with some skipping classes to work. Given the current situation, a partial refund for the period where classes were/are no longer conducted in the college is only reasonable and fair as this can help students to get through these tough times and pay for the upcoming academic year.
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    Created by Stefanie Luis
  • Re-open the NCAD community Garden
    Because we all liked it the way it was ! And It was also a resource for locals in the D8 area who aren't students at the college; be they people from the flats, students from other colleges, unemployed, former drug addicts, you name it.
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    Created by octavian fitzherbert
  • Government of National Unity
    We now have less than 10 years to reverse the climate emergency. The solutions to climate change are good for all our other issues with * cleaner air * warmer homes * smaller energy bills *better public transport * localised economies * organic food * biodiverse gardens * rich wildlife areas * seas teaming with fish and other marine animals * a more equal society. Let Ireland lead the world on this.
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    Created by Janet Hawker
  • Third School for Gorey
    Due the shortage of secondary school places in Gorey
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    Created by Elaine O'Malley Clarke
  • Save Mdu from deportation!
    Mduduzi is a founding member of the Melting Pot Luck, which was established in early 2017. He is integral to our group and has been our chairperson since November 2019. The Melting Pot Luck wouldn't be what it is without Mduduzi. Together, we have organised multiple small and large-scale events which have brought the community of Galway and people living in Direct Provision together through food and music. Our group has helped to break down the barriers that separate people, building friendships and promoting intercultural understanding. Mduduzi is from Zimbabwe and has been living in Direct Provision in Galway for the last 3 years. Despite living in those challenging and limiting conditions he has successfully integrated in Galway and has become a key part of the community. Mduduzi embodies the spirit of what makes Galway great, and he works tirelessly to help improve things for people living here. He is an amazingly talented, positive, warm, hard-working and socially conscious individual and he has made a huge effort to integrate and engage with the community in Galway. As well as volunteering with The Melting Pot Luck for the past three years Mduduzi has been involved with numerous volunteer programs with organisations like Galway City Partnership (GCP) and Amnesty International, running educational workshops in schools and training sessions with professionals. He also developed a social enterprise initiative with The Melting Pot Luck, GCP and Tiny Traders market during summer 2019. He is actively involved in the Galway arts scene, DJing regularly with Galway African Diaspora at Áras na Gael. Mduduzi is also on the committee for the University of Sanctuary at NUIG where he studies Science. We are all absolutely shocked and devastated that our friend and chairperson of our group has been told he can’t stay in Ireland. Mduduzi deserves better than the situation he is now faced with. He deserves sanctuary, he deserves welcome, and above all, he deserves to make a home and build a future here in Ireland. This dream, and all the work he has done in the community is at risk of being destroyed if he is deported. TD Charlie Flanagan has the power to grant Mduduzi humanitarian leave to remain in Ireland, and we urge him to do so. We ask you to please sign this petition to support our campaign, and share it widely with your contacts. Thank you.
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    Created by Melting Potluck
  • No to Increased Tuition Fees
    Students here pay around £4000 per year to attend university. These fees are a barrier to students from working class backgrounds and financial issues are a major cause of student distress and anxiety. The burden of balancing the books of the new NI Assembly should not be placed on our young people. Education is a right and should not be a commodity.
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    Created by Nicola Browne
  • The Right Inclusion Model for Every Child
    Our schools are facing overwhelming challenges in the provision of education for our children with special needs. The campaign for The Right Inclusion Model for Every Child calls for the State to provide for the rights of every child to an education. To respect the rights of all of our children, sufficient resources must be provided to those who have special educational needs. The Proclamation of our Republic promises to ‘cherish all the children of the nation equally’. Under the current model, inadequate resourcing means that children with additional needs are not guaranteed their right to equal access to education. The goal of our campaign is to achieve cross-party support for The Right Inclusion Model for Every Child ahead of the General Election and to have the principles of this model included on the next Programme for Government. We assert that The Right Inclusion Model for Every Child must include; • SNA allocation to match the needs of the children • Transparency in the Process: There are currently not enough SNAs in the system to match the needs and the appeals process is not fit for purpose. The proposed General Allocation Model cannot match the needs going forward, given that current needs are not being met. Meaningful consultation with schools, parents and children’s advocacy groups is necessary to inform the right inclusion model. • Multi-Disciplinary teams: Immediate removal of waiting lists for Assessment of Need to ensure timely, appropriate access to multi-disciplinary services. This will require considerable increases in staffing and resourcing of the various services. • Options for children and their families: To have options of placements in mainstream schools, special classes within mainstream schools, and special schools according to each child’s needs. We are asking for every General Election Candidate to sign up to our campaign and to pledge to deliver The Right Inclusion Model for Every Child as a matter of priority in the next government.
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    Created by Liz Carrigy
  • Cycle lane along coast from Dun Laoghaire to Blackrock (Booterstown)
    We need a safe place for our children and adults to cycle on the road for commuting to school and work. This would also provide for recreational cycling and people to enjoy the coast in a safe and peaceful manner. At the moment there is no continuous safe cycling for people in DLR. Most people currently don't cycle due to the dangerous nature of the roads in DLR. This could provide an impetus for cycling with a link all the way from Booterstown to Sandycove. There's been talk of a cycleway along the coast for over 20 years and still no sign of it.
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    Created by Sean Barry