• Support the Bill to ban hare coursing in Ireland
    Hares are a protected species in Ireland and an national symbol. Prior to a hare coursing event the hares are collected in a cruel manner using nets and then stored in horrendous conditions most likely in small boxes until they are released into a field and chased and mauled by greyhounds. Animal rights organisations have secretly documented and evidenced the cruel methods in collection and storing of the animals. Clare Daly, a TD for Dublin North – the only Dublin constituency, she says, which still has hare coursing events – told the Dail recently that the Irish Council Against Blood Sports has a video of barbarity in Balbriggan. Daly says that the rules around hare coursing are contradictory where, on the one hand, hares are protected under the Wildlife Act but, on the other, under the Animal Health and Welfare Act all animals are protected with the exception of hares to be coursed. She said that this resulted, in 2015, in a situation where 7,000 hares were taken from the wild to be used in live coursing events. While Creed said the figures show that in 2014-15 99.3% of hares are released back into the wild, Daly said it was often to die. “Reports from the National Parks and Wildlife Service… tell us that only 17 of the 75 events held in the country last year had National Parks and Wildlife Service officials in attendance and the state of many of the hares requiring assistance, which were released back to the wild distressed, is evident in its reports, which refute the information given to the Minister by Bord na gCon.” Many hares, she said, which are released back into the wild, were very distressed and die afterwards. Creed said that under legislation ensured a prohibition on the coursing of sick or pregnant hares and a requirement that hares be released back into the wild during daylight hours. However, Daly said at a coursing event in Nenagh, some of the hares released included heavily pregnant hares. Daly said the solution is to ban coursing outright, but Creed said he has no intentions to do so. Ireland is one of only 3 countries in Europe that allow this barbaric so called sport take place. Does this have a place in a caring and compassionate modern Ireland? For the last 25 years independent TD's have attempted to and failed to have this act banned in the Dail. Supporters call it tradition, a tradition where grown men stand in a field and cheer whilst watching animals be terrorised and mauled. The word tradition is used too often to for justification for terrible acts. How can we as a nation condemn other countries for animal cruelty like bull fighting and whale hunting when we accept this in our own lands. TD's should firstly be allowed to vote with their conscious and not with the whip and the government who has given its support to the continuation of hare coursing. Its important that we send a strong message to the government that it is not acceptable in a caring and compassionate Ireland that cherishes its protected species.
    241 of 300 Signatures
    Created by Baz Smyth Picture
  • Stop Unfair Car Insurance Premiums
    Car Insurance has increased again and is really affecting vulnerable people esp older people barely surviving on their pension. Older people, especially in rural areas, depend on their cars to get to the shops, to Mass and to the Post Office. Now older people are being forced off the road by unaffordable premiums. This further isolates a people who are already isolated by lack of rural transport and the depopulation of rural areas. Car insurance hikes also affects students who need car transport to get to college. Workers on low incomes can't afford to get to work. Anyone living in rural Ireland needs a car to get to schools, shops etc. My car insurance has been increased from 450 Euro in 2015 to 731 Euro in 2016. This is an increase of 281 Euro - 3 weeks pension. I have no claims and no penalty points to warrant this increase. This is beyond my reach and many older people I have spoken to are in the same position. There is a place called 'STOP' and this is it.
    10,164 of 15,000 Signatures
    Created by Lily O'Donoghue
  • UCC: Revise decision to name building after Dr. James Watson
    University College Cork is a welcoming and inclusive place of learning. In recent years, Dr. Watson has made a number of statements that are racist, misogynistic and homophobic. As such, it is unacceptable that members of the Governing Body would choose to name a building in UCC after a person with such a viewpoint as Dr. Watson. Therefore, we encourage you to sign this petition to show that students, staff members and the wider public will not accept this decision.
    908 of 1,000 Signatures
    Created by UCC Feminist Society
  • Justice for Greyhounds
    Exporting racing greyhounds to Asia is condemning them to certain death in areas where no animal welfare laws exist and where no rehoming programs are in place. When shipped to Macau to race at the infamous Canidrome, they are condemned to live in miserable conditions, in barren concrete cells, raced on dangerous tracks, and killed as soon as they don't place in three of five consecutive races. All greyhounds entering the Macau Canidrome will be dead within three years. At the end of 2015, the Australian ABC aired the investigation by Animals Australia regarding Australian greyhounds being exported to Asia (http://www.abc.net.au/7.30/content/2015/s4369266.htm). Following this report, and the understandable public reaction to it, Qantas made the following statement: "...in light of the story we have made the decision to no longer provide racing greyhound freight services to Asia." (http://www.smh.com.au/nsw/qantas-will-no-longer-carry-racing-greyhounds-on-flights-to-asia-20151212-glm08m.html). This had the effect of drying up the supply of greyhounds, especially those destined for Macau. Now racing greyhounds are being sourced from Ireland. In May, a shipment of 24 Irish greyhounds bound for Asia was spotted being transferred from the animal transport van, that took them from Ireland, into a furniture removal truck in Manchester. They were then driven in this furniture truck to Heathrow, bound for Asia, but the Animal Welfare Reception Centre refused to accept them due to their cages being unsuitable. These 24 greyhounds have since been returned to Ireland to the owner who tried to ship them to Macau. The Irish government and the IGB (Irish Greyhound Board) have been pressured by a growing international community to take action, and during a joint initiative between the DAFM, the International Greyhound Forum (represented by ISPCA and Dogs Trust), and the IGB it was stated that "All parties present agreed to actively explore all avenues to ensure the export of greyhounds takes place only to jurisdictions with high welfare standards.". This may include setting up a similar policy to that implemented in Australia in 2013 by Greyhounds Australasia (GA) to make it against industry rules to export greys to destinations where welfare standards don't meet local standards. We've already seen in Australia that a similar industry ruling didn't stop exports. 179 trainers have recently been charged by Greyhound Racing New South Wales with exporting Australian greyhounds to the prohibited jurisdiction of Macau and face fines, suspension or being banned from racing (http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-06-09/greyhound-racing-nsw-charges-179-trainers-owners/7497738). This demonstrates that an industry ban, especially when not policed, does nothing to stop greyhounds being exported to prohibited jurisdictions. What effectively stopped exports was the decision by Qantas to refuse carriage. We ask that the Irish government take a serious stand and legislates against the exportation of its racing greyhounds to countries with inadequate welfare standards. A list of jurisdictions should be drawn up that, due to inadequate welfare standards, become prohibited destinations for the export of Irish greyhounds and the government should make it illegal to export racing greyhounds to those destinations. This list should include, at least, China, Vietnam, Spain, Portugal, Morocco, Pakistan, Venezuela and Argentina. We ask that the IGB be held responsible and accountable for policing and enforcing this ban.
    4,165 of 5,000 Signatures
    Created by Julie McHenry Picture
  • Save the Liffey Cycle Route -- keep it on the quays
    Keep the Liffey Cycle Route on Dublin’s quays — say no to a backstreet detour, yes to a Dutch-style two-way cycle path reclaiming part of the quays and a new riverside park. Option 6 is workable and the best route for the city. Act now to save the route — sign the petition (coming soon), and email chiefexecutive@dublincity.ie and your local city councillors to make it clear you want the route to stay on the quays. After thousands of people supported the Liffey Cycle Route in a widely-publicised public consultation, Dublin City Council caved in to “severe” behind-closed-doors lobbying. Now the city council wants to detour the route away quays and onto back streets, removing a planned section with an iconic riverside park. There are pros and cons to all options, but a huge part of the importance of this project is to reclaim the a small part of riverside and provide a safe and attractive cycle route for the north and south quays. A detour into Smithfield will detract from the route and will not make many of the objectors happy. Keeping the route alongside the Liffey makes sense — it connects residents, commuters and tourists to the city centre’s main waterfront, is more attractive to users and it connects better to the southside, including Heuston station, the Irish Museum of Modern Art, the Guinness Storehouse, and hospitals and other large employers who are encouraging staff to cycle. Objections to keeping the route on the quays don’t make sense, read why here: http://irishcycle.com/quays/
    1,836 of 2,000 Signatures
    Created by Cian Ginty Picture
  • Make Cavan A TTIP Free Zone
    Our local businesses, environment and democracy are under threat from a trade deal currently being negotiated between the EU Commission and the USA. The deal is called TTIP and could outlaw local authorities’ support of local businesses, allow multinational corporations to sue us if councils deny fracking permits and open up services like water, health and education to privatisation. What’s up for grabs are the rules and regulations that force corporations to abide by standards that protect our health, our rights, our jobs, services and the environment. These regulations for example stop corporations releasing chemicals and products into the market before they are proven to be safe. They also make sure workers get their rights and that local communities are protected from environmental disasters. But if TTIP goes ahead corporations will get to have a say on policies that govern our daily lives - before we or even politicians get to see them. And if they don’t like the rules they will be able to sue governments when they make changes or bring in new policies that could potentially affect their profits. Right now in Canada a fracking company Lone Pine Resources Inc., is suing the government for its decision to not allow fracking in Quebec. They are able to do this because of an ISDS clause in another trade deal. In Egypt the government was sued by water company Veolia for attempting to bring in a minimum wage. Germany is being sued by Swedish energy company Vatenfall for €4.7 billion because of Germany's decision to phase out nuclear power. TTIP also removes barriers to US companies who want to sell their products in Europe. Right now the sale of US beef in Europe is very limited. Hormone injected beef is banned outright. Hundreds of councils across Europe have already said they don’t want TTIP. Because of people power politicians are waking up to the threat TTIP poses and to the fact that people aren’t going to stand aside and let our democracy and rights be sold off.
    50 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Noreen Porter Picture
  • Make Monaghan a TTIP Free Zone
    Our local businesses, environment and democracy are under threat from a trade deal currently being negotiated between the EU Commission and the USA. The deal is called TTIP and could outlaw local authorities’ support of local businesses, allow multinational corporations to sue us if councils deny fracking permits and open up services like water, health and education to privatisation. What’s up for grabs are the rules and regulations that force corporations to abide by standards that protect our health, our rights, our jobs, services and the environment. These regulations for example stop corporations releasing chemicals and products into the market before they are proven to be safe. They also make sure workers get their rights and that local communities are protected from environmental disasters. But if TTIP goes ahead corporations will get to have a say on policies that govern our daily lives - before we or even politicians get to see them. And if they don’t like the rules they will be able to sue governments when they make changes or bring in new policies that could potentially affect their profits. Right now in Canada a fracking company Lone Pine Resources Inc., is suing the government for its decision to not allow fracking in Quebec. They are able to do this because of an ISDS clause in another trade deal. In Egypt the government was sued by water company Veolia for attempting to bring in a minimum wage. Germany is being sued by Swedish energy company Vatenfall for €4.7 billion because of Germany's decision to phase out nuclear power. TTIP also removes barriers to US companies who want to sell their products in Europe. Right now the sale of US beef in Europe is very limited. Hormone injected beef is banned outright. Hundreds of councils across Europe have already said they don’t want TTIP. Because of people power politicians are waking up to the threat TTIP poses and to the fact that people aren’t going to stand aside and let our democracy and rights be sold off.
    240 of 300 Signatures
    Created by Emily Duffy Picture
  • Get Toilets in Mountjoy Prison
    There are people, human beings in Mountjoy Prison who while serving time need to do so with this minimum amount of dignity. Ireland has been chastised by the UN as far back as 1993 for this. When Ireland had more money than it knew what to do with, during the Celtic Tiger years it still didn't care enough to install toilets for these prisoners. Does anyone out there care about this? It's the modern day Magdeline Laundry or Industrial School scenario, of people bunged into a place where no one cares o considers them. It's a complete and total disgrace.
    9 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Roberta Carey
  • Support the Irish language - 733 campaign
    • 733 children’s names were submitted by parents in the Drumcondra/Marino/Dublin 1 area asking for a Gaelscoil. The submission was made to the Department of Education along with other submissions from other patrons. 733 is a record number for a Gaelscoil campaign nationwide. The school was denied in favour of an English speaking primary school and awarded to Educate Together. The new school will open in All Hallows, Drumcondra in 2016. FACT 24 = Number of Primary Schools in the Drumcondra, Marino, Dublin 1 Area 21 = English Schools 3 = All Irish Schools This decision makes it 22 English Schools and 3 All Irish Schools in the area In the context of Ireland’s centenary year it is deeply regrettable the Department of Education failed to support a campaign that had the highest numbers ever received and recorded in support of a Gaelscoil in the history of the state. ACTION REQUIRED 1. A second new primary school should be immediately sanctioned by the Department in the area of Drumcondra/Marino/Dublin 1 2. An alternative to a second school is to co-locate both a Gaelscoil & Educate Together School in All-Hallows Drumcondra 3. A new ruling stating an Irish Language School (minority language) should not have to compete directly in numbers with a majority language school. 4. Pitting parents against one another for a school for their children is wrong. The system needs to be changed 5. In our centenary year we should reflect on decisions by the Department of Education to deny an Irish language School and begin the conversation as to what role the Irish language will play in the next 100 years Support our campaign to have our choice of primary education recognised and to address the unfairness in the decision-making process for new primary schools. Sign our petition and encourage others to do the same.
    1,929 of 2,000 Signatures
    Created by Aidan Fitzsimons
  • Review & Revise the Broadcasting Authority of Ireland’s Code for Current Affairs Reporting
    The Code’s stated purpose is to achieve fairness, impartiality and objectivity. However when it comes to discussion on Ireland’s abortion laws, it is having the effect of censoring the voices of those who have been most impacted by Ireland’s restrictive regime . The BAI specifically took issue with the Graham and Helen Linehan advocating for legislative and constitutional change that would spare other women, girls and couples the trauma of being denied access to termination of pregnancy in cases of fatal foetal anomalies, and their support for Amnesty International’s campaign on this. This was despite the Ray D’Arcy Show seeking in advance and then reading out the views of two anti-choice organisations on both the Linehans’ story and Amnesty International’s campaign. Fairness, objectivity and impartiality were thus achieved. People must be allowed tell their true, factual personal stories without being silenced from naming and calling for the very changes that could vindicate their human rights and spare other women, girls and couples unnecessary trauma. It is in the public interest that broadcasters aren’t shackled by an interpretation of 'balance' which is so extreme as to be absurd. Red C/Amnesty International Ireland polling recently showed that only 14% of people trust the media as a source of information when deciding their stance on abortion. Those they trust most are health professionals and women who have had abortions. The same polling found that 52% of the Irish public feel they do not have enough information about the 8th Amendment, and think the media should give better information on it. Now that the government has promised that a Citizens’ Assembly will consider the 8th Amendment, there has never been a more critical time for the public to have information about its actual impacts on the lives of real women and their families. It is critical that the brave voices of those whose lives have been impacted by the 8th amendment can participate in the public conversation about this issue without the fear of having to be confronted in an adversarial manner about the choices that they made in the best interests of themselves and their families, and without feeling censored by the State, through the BAI, from calling for the legal changes necessary to prevent the suffering they endured being inflicted on others.
    2,420 of 3,000 Signatures
    Created by Gaye Edwards
  • No More Litter in the Ditches!
    Our roadsides are a shame . Litter is a serous disrespect to our country and communities
    18 of 100 Signatures
    Created by sean coleman
  • Save the "Port Of Cork Buildings" from being destroyed by a horrific modern development
    The Port Of Cork Buildings have been bought by American property developers recently. They plan to build the biggest skyscraper in Ireland on this site. It will cover up and destroy the Port buildings, these are the most historical, prominent, visually beautiful buildings in Cork City. The Port of Cork Buildings are listed buildings, they are supposed to be protected. Cork City Council has been allowing so many historical buildings in Cork City to be demolished, their idea of preserving buildings is to keep the front wall, (Some examples Navagation House by O Callaghan Properties and Camden Quay buildings demolished leaving only the front walls, another horrible example is the O Callaghan Properties development on Lavits Quay. Opera Lane didn’t even bother keeping the front and now Patrick’s Street has started losing its character and historic buildings). The Port buildings were constructed during the Napoleonic Wars by the prisoners of Spike Island more than 200 years ago. They are in such an important piece of strategic land in the center of the city and on the historic waterfront. These are the first buildings we see when we arrive in Cork. They have the possibility to make this city very special. These are a unique set of buildings and part of our cultural and historical maritime heritage - of international interest. If this huge development goes ahead the character of Cork will be lost forever. I have had a campaign to get these amazing buildings turned into a Port Of Cork Maritime Museum. They are in such an important piece of strategic land in the center of the city and on the historic waterfront. The idea of the Maritime Museum in this location would connect the City to The Harbour and would provide a perfect opportunity for ferry's to bring the people of Cork and tourists up and down the river Lee from Cork to the amazing Harbour and Spike Island. If a Maritime Museum was the chosen usage of these buildings open to the people of the city we could have amazing public civic occasions on this magical important strategic site. It is a disgrace on our politicians and planners, that they have allowed these amazing buildings to go into private ownership. I am inviting people who are interested in these buildings to contact me and campaign and make them into an important maritime civic amenity. Regards, John Adams johnadamsartist@gmail.com
    1,736 of 2,000 Signatures
    Created by John Adams Picture