• Provide Abortion Services in St. Luke's Hospital Kilkenny
    Kilkenny has voted overwhelmingly for a YES vote and the people of Kilkenny and Carlow have campaigned tirelessly for years to end the shame and stigma surrounding abortion. We have ended the need for people in crisis pregnancy having to travel abroad for healthcare. St. Luke's Hospital cannot continue to export people seeking abortions to other hospitals.
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    Created by Stephanie Hanlon Picture
  • Bypass A&E for cancer patients
    Cancer is tough enough in itself. Cancer patients are very vulnerable and their immune systems are compromised. Any additional stress such as being left on a trolley in A&E for hours and days, exposed to infection and without knowing when they will be admitted to a cancer ward is extremely detrimental. They should be seen by oncology straight away and extra cancer beds should be provided to ensure they can get the care they need as quickly as possible.
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    Created by Christiane Luke
  • Decriminilise Drug use
    Portugal’s decriminalization process is over a decade old, there are several long-term benefits that have been recognized, including the following: Substance abuse and addiction rates have been cut in half since decriminalization Addiction treatment and rehabilitation is less expensive than incarceration Individuals with substance abuse problems are much more likely to find recovery in rehab than in jail People completing treatment can become productive members of society much more easily than convicted felons Violence related to drug trafficking is greatly reduced Courts are freed up for other important work The rebellious, countercultural essence of drug use is changed when society sees it as a disease and not a crime
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    Created by James Sheehan
  • Provide Abortion Services in Carlow
    Carlow is one of the four counties in which not one single GP has signed up to provide the abortion service to people. People in Carlow campaigned tirelessly for abortion and Carlovians voted overwhelmingly for local healthcare. We have ended the need for people having to travel abroad. Carlow cannot continue to export people seeking healthcare to other counties.
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    Created by Stephanie Hanlon Picture
  • Exclusion Zone Legislation for abortion providers
    We have repealed the 8th amendment, 66.4% have voted to allow care for pregnant people who need abortions. These women and other people who are pregnant deserve to make their decision and access care in privacy and without intimidation. The staff working in GP surgeries and hospitals also deserve to have a workplace free from harassment and disruption, and patients who are attending for unrelated reasons should also be entitled to visit their caregiver without dealing with protestors.
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    Created by Parents For Choice
  • Please save lives, Introduce screening for SCID at birth
    The motivation behind this petition arose from the recent diagnosis of 6-month old baby Juniper with Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID). SCID is a life-threatening genetic condition. Therefore, we are calling on Simon Harris, the Minister for Health, to introduce screening for this disease in the newborn screening programme (heel prick test). Children with this condition have a severely impaired immune system and are particularly vulnerable to severe infection. The treatment for this condition (haematopoietic stem cell transplant-HSCT) has a much higher success rate if diagnosed early and before the affected infant acquires infections. The incidence in Ireland is approximately 1 in 37,000 children (1-2 cases per year); making it more common than half the diseases currently included in the test. In Ireland, the majority of SCID cases are not diagnosed until the affected infant develops symptoms of infection. Survival rates after HSCT in children with SCID diagnosed late and with infection have been reported at approximately 70%. Children diagnosed and treated early (before 3 months of age), before they have acquired any infections, have a much better chance of survival (>90%). A diagnosis of SCID can be made on the heel-prick test using PCR-based technology. Considering the vast difference in survival rates and the impact on children and families, it seems obvious that SCID should be included in the newborn screening programme. Internationally, this screening has already been included, with success, in New Zealand, Canada, Taiwan and every state in the US. Pilot schemes have also started in Israel, Australia, the Netherlands and the UK. Moreover, studies in these countries have also concluded that early diagnosis in the heel prick test and treatment prior to infection is more cost effective to the healthcare system. Diagnosing SCID early is particularly important since the introduction of the live rotavirus vaccine. While this vaccine is safe for healthy children, it can be dangerous for children with SCID. This highlights yet another crucial reason to implement screening for at birth. For Juniper’s parents, her diagnosis of SCID has been devastating and shocking, considering that up to a few weeks ago they believed she was a healthy and thriving baby. Unfortunately, due to the lack of testing for SCID, she spent 3 weeks in hospital, on 3 courses of antibiotics, while deteriorating rapidly before an accurate diagnosis was made. Now they must travel to the UK for life saving treatment, and face a lengthy and difficult journey ahead. Juniper’s parents do not want any other parents to endure what they have had to, when a simple blood test at birth could have prevented Juniper from contracting infection and given her a higher chance at survival. If you are a medical professional please include this in your signature. For more information on SCID please visit https://www.ipia.info/what-is-primary-immunodeficiency/severe-combined-immunodeficiency-scid/
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    Created by Friends and Family
  • Give Identity Rights to Adoptees in Ireland
    Irish adoptees have no automatic right to access our adoption files, birth certificate, health, heritage or history information. A right to identity is a recognised human right and adoptees are denied this right. This affects Irish Adoptees from historic, domestic adoption, along with their children and extended families.
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    Created by Maree Ryan-O'Brien Picture
  • Stop Referring Cancer Patients to Debt Collectors.
    The Irish Cancer Society say that they are getting getting letters, threatening phone calls, threats that their name will be made public if they don't the fees. This is deeply distressing and inhumane.
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    Created by Siobhan O' Donoghue
  • End Vulture Fund Evictions
    Vulture funds are indicative of a failed banking system. The term is coined in respect of the bird which feasts upon dead or dying creatures, it picks the final pieces of flesh from the bones. This is what is happening in Fine Gael/Fianna Fails Ireland. They are a corrupt force that take advantage of bad debt and poverty and have zero mercy in enforcing their control. The State has been complicit in this, Gardaí accompanying hired mercenaries to enact violence on people whose only crime is to want to keep a roof over their heads. We need legislate to end the sale of distressed debt to Vulture Funds. Protect Irish citizens from evictions as result of Vulture Fund acquisitions. Vulture Funds can buy a bad debt for as little as 4 cent for every €1, they then sue and for the full amount. So a customer could possibly, in theory have a debt of €100,000 - the Vultures buy it for €4,000 and sue the customer for €100,000 plus legal fees. This is a corrupt and unjust system designed to subjugate the working class and we demand that it ends, immediately!
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    Created by Social Change Picture
  • Stop Killing Minks and Foxes for Fur
    Shockingly, even Ireland has a secret fur trade - At present there are 5 licensed mink farms operating in the Republic of Ireland. One of these also had a small number of foxes. The media reported that a representative of the Irish Fur Breeders Association said that fox farming is being phased out due to economic reasons. In 2006, approximately 170,000 mink and 300 foxes were slaughtered in the Republic of Ireland for their fur pelts. Mink and foxes on fur farms are reared highly intensively in small cages before being killed at about 6 months old for their fur pelts. The pelts are exported for sale on the international fur markets, to be used by the fashion industry. At present, mink are farmed for their fur in the Republic of Ireland. There were also a small number of farmed foxes. The type of foxes reared on fur farms are silver foxes (which are a variety of the common red fox), and arctic foxes. Killing of both mink and foxes normally takes place on the farm, and there is no legal requirement for a veterinarian to be present. Mink are pulled out of their cages and put into a gassing box that holds around 50 to 70 animals. They are gassed to death in carbon monoxide or carbon dioxide. There are welfare concerns about batch killing of mink, and also about the types of gasses used. Farmed foxes are killed by electrocution. An electrode is placed in their anus and another in their mouth and they are killed by an electric current passing through them. Compassion-Ireland is totally opposed to the use of electrocution to kill animals. An undercover investigation by Compassion-Ireland and Respect for Animals in 2003 found that mink are kept in cages about 3 foot long and 1 foot wide, with a small nest box at one end. Fox cages have a floor area of about 4 foot by 4 foot and are about 28 inches high. Fox and mink cages are usually in rows inside buildings that have open sides. The animals’ droppings fall through the wire mesh floor of the cages. Farmed mink and foxes are fed on a porridge-like food made from chicken, meat and fish offal. This is placed on the top of each cage and the animals eat it through the wire mesh. Mink and foxes are confined in these cages throughout their lives until they are taken out to be killed. (How Mink and Foxes Should Live their life in the wild) - Mink in the wild always live near water and are good at swimming and diving. They even have small webbing between their toes. In the typical river environment, mink have a range of about 2 km along the river. Within their territories, mink often have several dens that they use to rest in and sleep in. Mink spend part of their time in water when hunting and part on the land, walking, bounding, rearing on their hind legs and climbing on rocks or trees. Mink are solitary animals and adults hunt alone. Silver foxes are a variety of the red fox. In the wild, they may travel great distances. The daily mean is 6 km. They can run fast, jump well and swim strongly. They dig dens or use the dens of other animals. Foxes may be solitary or live in a group. Arctic foxes are adapted to live in the snowy environment in the Arctic regions of Eurasia, North America, Greenland and Iceland. They roam across vast home ranges of around 30 km2 and even migrate more than 100 km in a single season. Arctic foxes can travel very long distances, often 10 to 20 km in a day. They can run fast and swim strongly. They build dens on the banks of streams, on hills or in rock piles, and these may be used by successive generations for 300 years. Arctic foxes are solitary animals.
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    Created by Slava Digriz Picture
  • Eoghan Murphy, Don't let people be evicted into homelessness
    It’s time the Government stepped up and recognised that having a home is more important than rich institutions and people making huge profits off the back of the housing crisis. But, they need to know that there is massive public pressure calling on them to act now.
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    Created by Emily Duffy Picture
  • Player Wills Community Campaign
    After years of private market failure in building residential accommodation, we must provide for a new model to tackle the housing crisis on lands which are currently in state control. Dublin 8 has been inundated with development applications for hotel and luxury student accommodation which is undermining the cohesiveness of our community. We want a sustainable urban quarter developed on the Player Wills land and this can only be done with Ministerial intervention to ensure that NAMA fulfill their social remit and deliver quality housing in the inner city.
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    Created by Rebecca moynihan