• Justice for UL Whistleblower Leona O’Callaghan
    Minister of Education, HEA and President Of UL, now that ye have found that Leona O’Callaghan was wronged, what are ye doing about her losing her job? My name is Dylan Campion, I’m 17 and son of Leona O’Callaghan who blew the whistle on financial wrongdoing in UL and was managed out of her job because of it. She was on Primetime and the news in the past few days. Back when my mam was trying to make decisions about payments that she knew shouldn’t be made out of public money, I remember how stressed she was, how much she worked back and how worried she was about losing her job. I mistakenly never thought it would come to that. She taught me that doing the right thing should always come first no matter what your personal risk is. She challenged her management about payments and chose her morals were more important than giving into pressure from her bosses higher up. I’ve seen my mam lose her job over this decision. I’ve seen her feel hopeless about her career and her future. I’ve seen her worry about money and having to cope on social welfare for years now when before all this she always worked and was good at her job. My mam tried really hard to go up against UL with solicitors but it went on for years. She did sit-ins, protests and lobbied ministers when she saw the same thing that happened to her happen to others. My mam has taught me the importance of truth and standing up for what’s right. A lot of people have said lovely things on Facebook about my mam and I believe that the honest people of Limerick can help put pressure on the Dept of Education and UL to sit with my mam and give her justice. Please sign the petition to show your support that it’s not ok to treat whistleblowers like my mam in the way they have. They should be thanked and promoted for doing the right thing not have their job and future taken from them. Regards, Dylan Campion
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    Created by Dylan Campion Picture
  • Keep Phibsborough Post Office Open
    Phibsborough Post Office is a major branch office of An Post, employing seven people directly and providing vital social and postal services to the communities of East Cabra and Phibsborough with a population of c. 15,000 people. The closure of the Post Office would result in the loss of a vital public service, particularly for the elderly.
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    Created by Joe Costello
  • Secure Hours Now
    I’ve been working for Dunnes Stores for 8 years now, and I still don’t know what my wages will be from week-to-week. On any payday, a Dunnes workers' wages can be slashed by up to 60% (more than €200). This makes it impossible for my family and I to plan our lives, and we’re not alone. There are almost 10,000 workers in Dunnes Stores who have the same worries I do. Most of us are low paid. Most of us are women. And most of us are on 15 hour contracts. So some weeks we will work 40 hours, but when a local manager takes a dislike to us, they can slash our hours to 15. And there are hundreds of thousands of workers across the country in a similar position. We don’t know from week-to-week whether we will be able to pay our bills. We can’t get loans or mortgages because the banks look at the lowest hours on our contracts and see how insecure our wages are. It’s impossible to have peace of mind. That’s why in April 2015, two and a half years ago, 6,000 of us went on strike to win secure hour contracts. After the strike, management targeted us. They sacked some of us, slashed the hours of others, changed our working patterns and generally made our lives hell. They use the allocation of hours as a control mechanism over us. So we now have to rely on politicians to legislate in order to make sure every worker in Ireland is protected from zero hour and “If and When” contracts. There have been several opportunities to pass legislation in recent years, which would have ended zero hours and ‘If and When’ contracts, but the government has delayed and postponed and are now preparing their own legislation which we believe will not benefit low hour workers. Our Union, Mandate, believes the government are going to leave loopholes open so that employers can still exploit workers like me. But if all TD’s commit to support the Secure Hours – Better Future charter, we can make sure no worker is exploited and workers like us can plan our day-to-day lives, provide for our families and pay our bills. Please sign this petition and call on your local representatives to support the Secure Hours – Better Future charter today.
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    Created by Muireann Dalton
  • Our Roadmap for Social Inclusion: Walking as One for an Inclusive Society
    The year 2017 marked twenty years since Ireland’s first comprehensive plan to address poverty: the National Anti-Poverty Strategy 1997-2006. The year 2018 marked key anniversary for End Poverty activists and for the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights! The 30th anniversary of the death of Joseph Wresinski, the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Martin Luther King, the centenary of the birth of Nelson Mandela (who launched the Make Poverty History Campaign) and the 70 years of the proclamation of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The year 2019 is starting with the Centenary of the first meeting of Dáil Éireann which occurred on 21 January 1919 in the Round Room of the Dublin Mansion House. In this first and highly symbolic meeting, the proceedings of the Dáil were conducted for the only time entirely in the Irish language, except for previously drafted declarations including the proclamation of the "Democratic Programme" including the following pledge: "It shall be the first duty of the Government of the Republic to make provision for the physical, mental and spiritual well-being of the children, to secure that no child shall suffer hunger or cold from lack of food, clothing, or shelter, but that all shall be provided with the means and facilities requisite for their proper education and training as Citizens of a Free and Gaelic Ireland." On the day of the Centenary, the Irish Times in partnership with the Children Rights' Alliance launched the #NoChild2020 campaign! No Child 2020 is an initiative by Fintan O'Toole and other Irish Times' journalists aiming to provide a sustained focus on child welfare and children’s issues over the coming year. We believe that Ireland needs a new Integrated Framework for Social Inclusion, to tackle inequality and poverty. We know Ireland faces major challenges: - to end the Housing Crisis - to deliver the SlainteCare’s vision for a better and fairer health system - to tackle Child Poverty and the poverty faced by the children's families - to implement the 17 Global Goals set down in the UN 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development including action to limit climate change with a strong concern for climate justice - to become a society with communities ready to leave no one behind, the promise of the UN 2030 Agenda If we are serious about tackling these issues, and serious about lifting people out of poverty and eliminating its causes, we must have a consistent, comprehensive plan to address poverty and social exclusion. Such a plan will only succeed if it is owned by civil society at large and also by the people experiencing poverty, not just politicians and the organisations that work to combat inequality and exclusion. Our call to action: let's walk as one to end poverty! In the follow-up of the 70th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (10 December 2018), as Ireland marks the Centenary of the Democratic Programme, strengthened by the launch of the "No Child 2020" initiative, inspired by the "End Poverty" legacies of Martin Luther King and Nelson Mandela, inspired also by the pledge of Joseph Wresinski: "To come together is our solemn duty," and following the call by Mary Robinson and the Elders to "Walk Together", we seek a new approach. Let's bring everyone who wants to make a difference together! All stakeholders: public bodies, teachers, trainers and researchers, corporates and services, youth groups and pensioners, and the people who fight against the poverty and stigma that they experience. Let's say: "We – citizens, workers, leaders, managers, carers, parents, activists or professionals or both – are ready to be part of the End Poverty plan. We all need to own this plan: to know the goals and own them. Together we wish to take part in a strong participatory process to make the next Anti-Poverty Plan the best ever. Those who live with poverty and social exclusion deserve it. They also should have the opportunity help develop this new plan. And when the plan is in place they should be able to play their part to ensure it is implemented. I have a role to play and I support this call to action and would like to be involve in the design, implementation and monitoring of our common plan!” Let us leave no one behind! All together in dignity!"
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    Created by All Together in Dignity Ireland Picture
  • Stop Childcare Facilities For Students Closing At IT Tallaght
    It is important that the childcare facilities stay open because many students education is been put at risk as they cant afford private childcare or find available places for their children die to large waiting lists and high fees. Barriers should not be put in the way of peoples education.
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    Created by Shane Greene Picture
  • Apologise for the Mistreatment of Au Pair Paloma Aparecida Silva Carvalho.
    Although many Au Pairs have been questioned, have had their mobiles confiscated, and some of them have been deported over the years, Paloma's case was particularly appalling. She was coming to Ireland as a tourist. Ireland has become a multicultural society which must be prepared to treat people fairly. It's important to review immigration practices in order to ensure reasonable use of legal powers over those arriving in Ireland, especially those from marginalised groups. An apology from the Minister of Justice will not change what Paloma has been through but it would demonstrate an attempt to recognise unfair practices and the commitment to tackle the issue.
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    Created by Au Pair Rights Ireland Picture
  • Justice for Fyffes Workers in Costa Rica and Honduras!
    Food workers and trade unions in the food export sector of Honduras and Costa Rica continue to be subjected to unsafe working conditions and not having their legal rights fulfilled. The estimated 25,000 people employed in the melon export sector in Honduras, of which 70% are women, regularly work 12-14 hour days, 7 days a week. The International Labour Rights Forum (2012) reports that 85% of workers earn less than the minimum wage [1]. Fyffes has been at the centre of several shocking scandals involving trade union violations and abuse of workers in Honduras and Costa Rica. A report by the US Department of Labor (2015) [2] detailed a litany of exploitative practices, ongoing labour code violations and ill-treatment of workers by the Fyffes subsidiary SurAgro in Honduras, including: That the company failed to pay the minimum wage, the 13th and 14th month bonuses, the seventh day bonus, and overtime; Failed to provide personal protective equipment and potable water; imposed a 300 HNL (US $14.40) penalty for missing a day of work (even with permission from a supervisor) in addition to that day’s salary; Threatened workers with dismissal for speaking with the Honduran Secretariat of Labor and Social Security (STSS) The general union in the United Kingdom, GMB, has called the actions of SurAgro one of the worst cases they have recorded, having documented “a shocking litany of abuse and exploitation on the part of Fyffes subsidiaries in Honduras” [3] and commented that “Fyffes... have no respect for domestic or international law governing workers’ rights and must be brought to book” [4]. In January 2016, workers at the Fyffes subsidiary became the first workers in the melon export sector to unionise and a local branch of the agriculture trade union STAS was formed. The following day, four trade union leaders were locked up in an office and threatened by the Chief of Security until they signed a document renouncing their union membership [5]. In an equally sinister occurrence, it was reported by the International Trade Union Confederation that on 13 April 2017, the trade unionist Moisés Sánchez (General Secretary of STAS’s sub-branch at Fyffes’ subsidiary in Honduras) was kidnapped, beaten and threatened with death if he continued his trade union work [6].  In May 2017 Fyffes was suspended from the Ethical Trading Initiative [ETI], an alliance of companies, trade unions and NGOs that promotes respect for workers' rights around the globe, finding that “the actions and approach taken by SurAgro [the Fyffes-owned Honduran melon plantation at the centre of the allegations] … contravene the open approach to legitimate trade union activities that ETI would expect within the supply chain to an ETI member” [7]. Despite the sale of Fyffes to the Japanese Sumitomo Corporation in early 2017, the Irish business news website Fora reported in June 2017 that David McCann and the “senior management team” based at the Fyffes head office in Dublin were handling the negotiations between the complainants, ETI and Fyffes [8]. Therefore, the Latin America Solidarity Centre is joining with other trade unions, NGOs and international Civil Society Organisations and demanding this actions from Fyffes.
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    Created by Thais Mantovani
  • Pensions for Community Employment Supervisors
    Community employment Supervisors were awarded a Managerial pension in 2008 by the Labour Court and haven't received it yet. So many supervisors have retired since 1994 to date and todate have received nothing.
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    Created by John Doran
  • Tell Minister Bruton- Education needs regulation
    English Language teachers generally lack basic workers’ rights such as sick and holiday pay, pay scales, payment for training/professional development, permanent contracts/ contracts of indefinite duration (regardless of length of service), maternity/paternity pay, and access to pensions. The Unite ELT branch committee have requested a meeting with minister Richard Bruton which has been refused. We are asking you to support our campaign calling on the minister to meet with representatives of English Language Teachers to discuss regulations governing basic working conditions for teachers.
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    Created by Keith Murdiff Picture
  • Equal Rights for School Secretaries
    Secretaries employed under the DES 1978/79 scheme enjoy Civil Service salaries and terms of employment while secretaries employed after this time are paid through a grant given to individual schools where their salary, terms etc. are decided by the Board of Managements. In spite of all School Secretaries performing similar duties there is a vast discrepancy between pay and terms. Perhaps most importantly, secretaries paid directly by their schools have absolutely no pension to look forward to (even after 20 years plus loyal service) while those employed by the Dept. can look forward to a full Civil Service pension. The result of this arrangement is extremely unjust and we are asking to have it rectified with all School Secretaries being treated as Civil Servants and receiving remuneration and pension rights in line with their years of service.
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    Created by Jackie O'Meara
  • Deliveroo - Pay your workers fairly
    Deliveroo operates on a commission based mobile app which runs on zero hours contract. Drivers are paid much less than minimum wage (on average €8.50 an hour) and rely solely on there being enough drops/deliveries available. They are not covered by insurance, must pay €200 for equipment and also extra running costs such as ringing customers /paying for mobile data from their own earnings. Drivers are not covered by employment laws or insurance . We need to send a message loud and clear to management that workers keep the business coming in and deserve to be treated with dignity and respect. Please sign this petition.
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    Created by Deliveroo Worker
  • Petition to persuade Bernie Sanders to give public speech in Dublin on June 4th/5th
    Bernie is giving a speech on June 4th which sold out after 1 minute. There are thousands of people who are willing to pay to hear him speak, to hear a voice for the people. Someone who stands up for the environment, all people and the planet as a whole. My hope is that hearing Bernie speak could spark the revolution that is needed in Ireland so we can transform our country and go back to the values it was founded on.
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    Created by Cormac Nugent Picture