• Aramark Off Our Campus
    Profiting from the incarceration of vulnerable peoples is not in line with Trinity’s statement that they “will fearlessly engage in actions that advance the cause of a pluralistic, just, and sustainable society”. Aramark’s actions should not be tolerated or endorsed by the college. This termination of contract must occur at the next available break clause. If replaced, the replacement must be a contractor that is not involved in the direct provision system. Aramark Ltd. have gone from being a relatively obscure American company in Ireland to being at the forefront of Dublin life. They recently purchased Avoca Ltd., as well as having new catering contracts with Trinity College Dublin in the new Westland East food court and Dundrum Shopping Centre. Aramark received €5.2 million in investment from the Irish government in 2016 for services to three direct provision centres - Kinsale Road in Co. Cork, Lissywollen in Co. Meath, and Knockalisheen in Co. Limerick. Residents of these centres do not feel that this large sum is being invested responsibly. In 2015 residents carried out a brief hunger strike in the Aramark run centre in Knockalisheen, Co. Limerick, after some were hospitalized as a result of the poorly produced food. A year earlier a hunger strike occurred in the Lissywollen Accommodation Centre in Athlone, Co. Meath, also run by Aramark- this time due to small portion sizes, poor hygiene, and unacceptable living standards. By continuing their contract with Aramark the board of Trinity College Dublin are supporting these inhumane conditions, and are ignoring the voices of some of the most vulnerable people in society. We need to give asylum seekers their basic human rights by providing them with decent food, housing, and acceptance in our country. 1 - https://www.tcd.ie/strategy/strategic-plan-201419.pdf 2 - http://www.universitytimes.ie/2016/11/as-part-of-new-deal-three-new-food-outlets-to-replace-westland-cafe/ 3 - https://www.businessworld.ie/news/New-Chopped-outlet-for-UCD-567576.html 4 - https://www.irishtimes.com/news/social-affairs/state-paid-43-5m-to-eight-direct-provision-operators-in-2016-1.2987004 5 - http://www.limerickleader.ie/news/local-news/198585/Hunger-strike-at-Knockalisheen-asylum-centre.html 6 - https://www.irishtimes.com/news/social-affairs/asylum-seekers-refuse-food-in-protest-over-conditions-at-direct-provision-centre-1.1918296?mode=sample&auth-failed=1&pw-origin=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.irishtimes.com%2Fnews%2Fsocial-affairs%2Fasylum-seekers-refuse-food-in-protest-over-conditions-at-direct-provision-centre-1.1918296
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    Created by Jessie Dolliver
  • Our Roadmap for Social Inclusion: Walking as One for an Inclusive Society
    The year 2017 marked twenty years since Ireland’s first comprehensive plan to address poverty: the National Anti-Poverty Strategy 1997-2006. The year 2018 marked key anniversary for End Poverty activists and for the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights! The 30th anniversary of the death of Joseph Wresinski, the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Martin Luther King, the centenary of the birth of Nelson Mandela (who launched the Make Poverty History Campaign) and the 70 years of the proclamation of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The year 2019 is starting with the Centenary of the first meeting of Dáil Éireann which occurred on 21 January 1919 in the Round Room of the Dublin Mansion House. In this first and highly symbolic meeting, the proceedings of the Dáil were conducted for the only time entirely in the Irish language, except for previously drafted declarations including the proclamation of the "Democratic Programme" including the following pledge: "It shall be the first duty of the Government of the Republic to make provision for the physical, mental and spiritual well-being of the children, to secure that no child shall suffer hunger or cold from lack of food, clothing, or shelter, but that all shall be provided with the means and facilities requisite for their proper education and training as Citizens of a Free and Gaelic Ireland." On the day of the Centenary, the Irish Times in partnership with the Children Rights' Alliance launched the #NoChild2020 campaign! No Child 2020 is an initiative by Fintan O'Toole and other Irish Times' journalists aiming to provide a sustained focus on child welfare and children’s issues over the coming year. We believe that Ireland needs a new Integrated Framework for Social Inclusion, to tackle inequality and poverty. We know Ireland faces major challenges: - to end the Housing Crisis - to deliver the SlainteCare’s vision for a better and fairer health system - to tackle Child Poverty and the poverty faced by the children's families - to implement the 17 Global Goals set down in the UN 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development including action to limit climate change with a strong concern for climate justice - to become a society with communities ready to leave no one behind, the promise of the UN 2030 Agenda If we are serious about tackling these issues, and serious about lifting people out of poverty and eliminating its causes, we must have a consistent, comprehensive plan to address poverty and social exclusion. Such a plan will only succeed if it is owned by civil society at large and also by the people experiencing poverty, not just politicians and the organisations that work to combat inequality and exclusion. Our call to action: let's walk as one to end poverty! In the follow-up of the 70th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (10 December 2018), as Ireland marks the Centenary of the Democratic Programme, strengthened by the launch of the "No Child 2020" initiative, inspired by the "End Poverty" legacies of Martin Luther King and Nelson Mandela, inspired also by the pledge of Joseph Wresinski: "To come together is our solemn duty," and following the call by Mary Robinson and the Elders to "Walk Together", we seek a new approach. Let's bring everyone who wants to make a difference together! All stakeholders: public bodies, teachers, trainers and researchers, corporates and services, youth groups and pensioners, and the people who fight against the poverty and stigma that they experience. Let's say: "We – citizens, workers, leaders, managers, carers, parents, activists or professionals or both – are ready to be part of the End Poverty plan. We all need to own this plan: to know the goals and own them. Together we wish to take part in a strong participatory process to make the next Anti-Poverty Plan the best ever. Those who live with poverty and social exclusion deserve it. They also should have the opportunity help develop this new plan. And when the plan is in place they should be able to play their part to ensure it is implemented. I have a role to play and I support this call to action and would like to be involve in the design, implementation and monitoring of our common plan!” Let us leave no one behind! All together in dignity!"
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    Created by All Together in Dignity Ireland Picture
  • Don't air the Living With Lucy episode featuring Katie Hopkins
    Racism and hate speech is dangerous and legitimises and provokes hate crime. Programmes such as Living With Lucy are designed not to critique or analyse the views of guests but to increase their popularity and familiarity with the general public.
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  • Dublin City Council Withdraw Freedom of the City from Aung San Suu Kyi
    No human being deserves to beaten, killed or starved to death because of their ethnic and religious identity -- please stand up for the dignity and humanity of the Rohingya people. Despite the government of Myanmar's denial of state complicity, there is overwhelming evidence of state sanctioned violence and instances in which the military refuse to intervene and have even taken part in organised and premeditated attacks targeting Rohingyas. The Government of Myanmar must be held accountable for its complicity in the persecution of a vulnerable minority group. People all over the world including Ireland, respected and admired Aung San Suu Kyi. She was known as a figure of patience and peace, who eventually took back the power in her country peacefully from the military dictatorship in Myanmar. Her actions or lack thereof since, have made many people disappointed and angry. There has been no official position from Aung San Suu Kyi with regards to the human right violations that have been rampant as experienced by the Rohingya minority. The Rohingya in the Northern Rakhine State are being subjected to gang-rapes, executions, torture, mass arrests and the burning down of villages by the Burmese Army and security forces. A UN Human Rights report in February described what was happening in Rakhine State as likely to amount to crimes against humanity. An interim report in January by a commission set up by the Myanmar President claimed that there was no evidence that any human rights violations had been taking place in Northern Rakhine State since the army crackdown began in October. The UK Government has referred to this report as not credible.
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  • West Kerry Native Irish Speakers
    Preservation of our beautiful native tongue which has been denied and destroyed for centuries needs to be prioritised by supporting native Irish speakers to live in West Kerry.
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    Created by Pol MacCoinnich
  • Hold a Competition For A New Rebel Flag
    After the attacks in America by racists wielding the confederate flag, it's important that Irish sports fans don't seem to be endorsing the racism long associated with the confederate flag. But, Cork's history as the rebel county should be celebrated, and this is a great opportunity to do it!
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  • Apologise for the Mistreatment of Au Pair Paloma Aparecida Silva Carvalho.
    Although many Au Pairs have been questioned, have had their mobiles confiscated, and some of them have been deported over the years, Paloma's case was particularly appalling. She was coming to Ireland as a tourist. Ireland has become a multicultural society which must be prepared to treat people fairly. It's important to review immigration practices in order to ensure reasonable use of legal powers over those arriving in Ireland, especially those from marginalised groups. An apology from the Minister of Justice will not change what Paloma has been through but it would demonstrate an attempt to recognise unfair practices and the commitment to tackle the issue.
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    Created by Au Pair Rights Ireland
  • Conor McGregor: Apologise for the use of racist language
    The issue of racism in sports is a serious one, it particularly targets sportsmen of black ethnicity. Conor McGregor has repeatedly used racist language, jokes and allusions; and it is time that we tell him that Irish people don't find this acceptable nor a good example for our young people. Conor McGregor is one of Ireland's most renowned sportsman and a huge inspiration for many among Ireland's youth. He has in the past described Latino fighters as "cholos", "cockroaches" or threatened "to turn their favelas into sweatshops". Most recently he addressed a fellow African American sportsman telling him "dance for me boy" and talking about "dancing monkeys", racially charged sentences evoking the slavery past. It is important to tell Conor McGregor that racism is not a joke, it is not banter and that Ireland as a nation does not tolerate racism, in sports or elsewhere. More information below: http://www.nydailynews.com/sports/king-conor-mcgregor-bigot-free-pass-article-1.3260252 http://www.nydailynews.com/sports/more-sports/conor-mcgregor-floyd-mayweather-turn-trash-talking-notch-article-1.3321981
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    Created by Pablo Rojas Coppari
  • Stop the Cúl Trá evictions!
    Galway City Council is planning to evict 10 families from Cúl Trá halting site in Lower Salthill, Galway leaving them homeless and with no alternative culturally appropriate accommodation.[1] This eviction would make over 42 people homeless including 22 children aged between 4 months and 10 years, some with medical conditions such as cystic fibrosis. The families were issued a notice to vacate by June 5th and Galway City Council has said it will consider court action if the ten families do not leave the site. Galway City Council has been well aware of overcrowding on Cúl Trá site for over a decade and yet no alternative halting site accommodation has been developed.[2] The Cúl Trá site was built 21 years ago to accommodate 6 families. No new halting site has been built in the city since. The 10 families that were served notices to vacate are the children of the 6 original families and have spent their whole lives living on the site. The families are part of the Salthill community with children attending local schools. One resident said that the children are the “heart and soul” of the community. If families are evicted they will be forced to leave their community and live on the side of the road without basic amenities. Kathleen Ward, one of the residents said; “The site is a fire and safety issue but isn’t it a fire and safety issue to put us out on the side of the road? We have nowhere to go”.[3] Galway City Council has proposed 3 pieces of land for temporary halting sites to address the Traveller accommodation crisis. Areas identified for the proposed sites are Ballymoneen Road, Headford Road and Westside. However, at a public council meeting, some local councillors have objected to these proposed halting sites. We are calling on Brendan McGrath to stop the Cúl Trá evictions and to use his executive powers to develop the proposed halting sites in Galway city. Notes 1. Galway City Council has a legal obligation to provide culturally appropriate accommodation under the Housing (Traveller Accommodation) Act 1998. 2. The need for additional halting sites to provide accommodation for the families at risk of eviction has been included in successive Traveller Accommodation Programmes however no new halting site has been built. 3. In 2016, in the wake of the Carrickmines tragedy, a fire safety audit of Traveller specific accommodation was conducted by The National Directorate for Fire and Emergency Management and a report was compiled with recommendations to address fire safety issues. This report recommended that measures to address fire safety should not be used to address overcrowding or other broader site management issues.
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    Created by Galway Traveller Movement
  • Scrap the Blasphemy Law
    It prohibits the “publishing or uttering [of] matter that is grossly abusive or insulting in relation to matters sacred by any religion, thereby intentionally causing outrage among a substantial number of adherents of that religion”. Fundamentalist organisations have cited Ireland’s law as best practice and has even proposed the adoption of its precise wording to limit human rights on freedom of conscience. Now Stephen Fry is being investigated under this terrible law. Now its time to scrap it. http://www.thejournal.ie/stephen-fry-complaint-of-blasphemy-3376318-May2017/?utm_source=facebook_short
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  • Petition to persuade Bernie Sanders to give public speech in Dublin on June 4th/5th
    Bernie is giving a speech on June 4th which sold out after 1 minute. There are thousands of people who are willing to pay to hear him speak, to hear a voice for the people. Someone who stands up for the environment, all people and the planet as a whole. My hope is that hearing Bernie speak could spark the revolution that is needed in Ireland so we can transform our country and go back to the values it was founded on.
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    Created by Cormac Nugent
  • Keep people working in libraries not machines
    People are losing contact with people leading to poorer mental health. Libraries are ideal places to have a chat with someone. Also working there is a lovely satisfying job.
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    Created by Sinead O Brien